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First POST: The Fire This Time

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, April 23 2014

The New York City Police Department sets off a social media firestorm; how to address your "pipeline problem"; battling "online thought police" in the GLBTQ world; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Thousands

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, August 16 2013

Exclusively for Personal Democracy Plus subscribers: The implications of Barton Gellman's huge new NSA scoop; Wired shows how tired it is of women; Shark Week ends; and much, much more. Read More

San Francisco Pilots Restaurant Inspections in Yelp Reviews

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, January 17 2013

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee is expected to announce today that his city's restaurant inspection data will begin to appear on Yelp, the business listings service. Also included in the announcement, expected at the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Washington, D.C., is that Yelp, in conjunction with city technologists in San Francisco and New York, NY, have created what they hope will become a de-facto standard for restaurant inspection data. Called Local Inspector Value-Entry Specification, or LIVES, the hope is that this specification will make restaurant inspection information easy for developers to handle and, as a result, more ubiquitous on the web. Read More

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New Media Sites in Iran Blur Lines Between Citizen Journo, Professional Journo, & Activist

In 2010, Newsweek declared Iran the “birthplace of citizen journalism.” Iranian bloggers were hailed by Westerners as “brave” for their coverage of the aftermath of the disputed 2009 election. A 40-second video of the death of Neda Agha-Soltan during an anti-government protest won a prestigious George Polk Award, the first anonymously-produced work to be so honored. And then came the 2013 study “Whither Blogestan,” which sought to explain Iran's shrinking blogosphere. Of nearly 25,000 highly active and connected blogs in 2008 and 2009, only 20 percent were still online in September 2013.

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