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The New Yorker Hopes "Strongbox" Is a Wiretap-Proof Sieve for Leaks

BY Miranda Neubauer | Thursday, May 16 2013

The New Yorker yesterday became the first outlet to implement DeadDrop, a new system for sources to submit information to journalists online in a more secure and anonymous way than, for example, email. Read More

Gavin Newsom On the Meaning of "Citizenville:" A Q&A

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Tuesday, February 26 2013

Sergey Brin helps Gavin Newsom put on a pair of Google glasses. Image: Current TV

California's lieutenant governor, Gavin Newsom, has just published "Citizenville," a light volume at around 240 pages that urges American citizens and their local governments to re-imagine how the process of governing might work in the digital age. In an edited Q&A, Sarah Lai Stirland asks Newsom to explain the meaning behind his manifesto. Read More

Why Julian Assange is Wikileaks' Single Point of Failure

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, August 16 2012

Is this Wikileaks' future home? Photo by David Torres Costales / @DavoTC

Julian Assange is back in the news today because, after nearly two months of holding out in Ecuador's London embassy, he has been granted "political asylum" by the Ecuadorian government. The decision has set off a diplomatic stand-off, with the U.K. government threatening to revoke the embassy's diplomatic status, and Ecuador responding with anger. In this article, I argue that the cause of transparency is far, far bigger than the legal troubles of one brilliant, courageous but ultimately flawed individual. Unfortunately, he has turned into Wikileaks' single point of failure. Britain ought to let Assange to Ecuador, because there's little chance he can get a fair trial in either Sweden or the United States, but then let's be done with him. Those of us who want freedom of information to thrive should learn a key lesson from Assange's case. For information to flow freely, there can't be any single point of control. Read More

Computer Programmers Create Algorithm that Predicts When and Where Violence Will Erupt in Afghanistan

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, July 23 2012

A group of computer programmers has developed an algorithm that they say allows them to predict where and when violence will break out in Afghanistan. The Los Angeles Times reports that the programmers created the algorithm in 2010, based on 77,000 incident reports to create a map that showed all the border hotspots. Then they built on their success by applying the algorithm to Wikileaks data on written reports from 2004-2009. Read More

With "Syria Files," Has WikiLeaks Broken Its Slump?

BY Lisa Goldman | Thursday, July 5 2012

WikiLeaks began today to publish the "Syria Files" — more than two million emails that the document-leaking organization says chronicle exchanges with Syrian officials dating from August 2006 to March 2012. WikiLeaks itself warns that not every document it is publishing can verifiably be said to be authentic, and has not indicated yet where it got the tranche. Read More

A Wikileaks for the U.N.'s Would-Be Internet Regulators

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, June 6 2012

Mercatus Institute senior researcher Jerry Brito thinks people on the Internet should know what people at the United Nations propose to do to the Internet. That's why he's launching a site called WCITLeaks.org, where he's pledging to anonymously publish any documents sent to him outlining proposals about U.N. regulation of the Internet that might be discussed in December at a meeting called the World Conference on International Communications.

Update: WCITLeaks says it's got its first leak. Read More

As WikiLeaks Struggles, Copycats Die But Online Whistle-Blowing Thrives

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, May 29 2012

Julian Assange at PDF 2010 (with Daniel Ellsberg and Micah Sifry in foreground). Photo by JD Lasica.

With WikiLeaks in the news today because of the British Supreme Court decision to allow him to be extradited to Sweden, it's a good time ask: what about all those other WikiLeaks-style whistle-blowing websites that were launched back in late 2010 and early 2011? Read More

Split by SouthWest: My SXSW 2012 Diary

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, March 15 2012

danah boyd and Alex Howard at SXSW 2012 (Photo by Micah L. Sifry)

PDM editorial director Micah L. Sifry spent last Friday through Monday at South by SouthWest Interactive, attending panels, keynotes and hanging out. Here's his report: SXSW is still a place where sessions packed with thousands of attendees cheer for the iconoclasts and the game-changers. It is also much more of a business networking conference than an internet futurists' playpen. In short, it has a split personality. Read More

Movement Times: TechPresident's Top Posts of 2011

BY Micah L. Sifry and Nick Judd | Wednesday, December 21 2011

Tahrir Square in February. By Ramy Raoof

From the streets of Tunisia to Wall Street, and online from the WikiLeaks wars to the early election skirmishes of 2012, this has been a tumultuous time. Next year, who knows, maybe everything will just get really boring. Though we kind of doubt it. But in case you missed anything, or just want a refresher on what went down on these pixels, here's our subjective, selective and unrepresentative sampler of the Best of techPresident 2011. Read More

Greenwald: Hillary Clinton is Internet-Freedom-washing U.S. Policy

BY Nick Judd | Friday, December 9 2011

Glenn Greenwald thinks Hillary Clinton's recent Internet freedom speech at the Hague is all hot air. Read More