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A Wikileaks for the U.N.'s Would-Be Internet Regulators

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, June 6 2012

Mercatus Institute senior researcher Jerry Brito thinks people on the Internet should know what people at the United Nations propose to do to the Internet. That's why he's launching a site called WCITLeaks.org, where he's pledging to anonymously publish any documents sent to him outlining proposals about U.N. regulation of the Internet that might be discussed in December at a meeting called the World Conference on International Communications.

Update: WCITLeaks says it's got its first leak. Read More

As WikiLeaks Struggles, Copycats Die But Online Whistle-Blowing Thrives

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, May 29 2012

Julian Assange at PDF 2010 (with Daniel Ellsberg and Micah Sifry in foreground). Photo by JD Lasica.

With WikiLeaks in the news today because of the British Supreme Court decision to allow him to be extradited to Sweden, it's a good time ask: what about all those other WikiLeaks-style whistle-blowing websites that were launched back in late 2010 and early 2011? Read More

Split by SouthWest: My SXSW 2012 Diary

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, March 15 2012

danah boyd and Alex Howard at SXSW 2012 (Photo by Micah L. Sifry)

PDM editorial director Micah L. Sifry spent last Friday through Monday at South by SouthWest Interactive, attending panels, keynotes and hanging out. Here's his report: SXSW is still a place where sessions packed with thousands of attendees cheer for the iconoclasts and the game-changers. It is also much more of a business networking conference than an internet futurists' playpen. In short, it has a split personality. Read More

Movement Times: TechPresident's Top Posts of 2011

BY Micah L. Sifry and Nick Judd | Wednesday, December 21 2011

Tahrir Square in February. By Ramy Raoof

From the streets of Tunisia to Wall Street, and online from the WikiLeaks wars to the early election skirmishes of 2012, this has been a tumultuous time. Next year, who knows, maybe everything will just get really boring. Though we kind of doubt it. But in case you missed anything, or just want a refresher on what went down on these pixels, here's our subjective, selective and unrepresentative sampler of the Best of techPresident 2011. Read More

Greenwald: Hillary Clinton is Internet-Freedom-washing U.S. Policy

BY Nick Judd | Friday, December 9 2011

Glenn Greenwald thinks Hillary Clinton's recent Internet freedom speech at the Hague is all hot air. Read More

New Wikileaks Release Helps Explain Who's Reading Your Email, and How

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, December 1 2011

Here and there, outlets like Wired's Threat Level blog or the Washington Post, with an ongoing focus on privacy in the Internet age, have peeled at the edges of the veneer that sits atop a vast and sophisticated ... Read More

'Unauthorized' Assange Autobiography to Be Released Today

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, September 22 2011

NPR.org has this story on Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, whose autobiography, NPR reports, was released on Thursday in Britain — without his say-so: British publisher Canongate decided to go ahead and release ... Read More

Random Acts of Blindness? Air Force List of WikiLeaks Banned Sites is Released

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, September 12 2011

Thanks to some dogged nudging by the good folks at MuckRock.com*, we now have an authoritative list of the websites blocked by the U.S. Air Force because of the WikiLeaks disclosures. The list of 45 sites primarily ... Read More

The Fall of WikiLeaks: Cablegate2, Assange and Icarus

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, September 2 2011

I'm theoretically on vacation right now and scarcely in a position to do a deep dive into all the news and commentary, but here's one quick comment about WikiLeaks's decision to release the complete and unredacted ... Read More

Quote Of The Day: Glenn Greenwald On This Whole Wikileaks Kerfuffle

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, August 30 2011

As far as OpenLeaks is concerned, I have found the whole thing to be strange from the beginning, because if you look at the way in which this sort of dissident faction left Wikileaks and began this competing ... Read More

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Company

The global "Snowden effect" is huge; how many consumer-facing online services fail the user privacy test; the Dems' 2016 digital to-do list; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Mood Slime

The Sony email leak reveals the MPAA's campaign against Google; how Uber is lobbying in local markets; mapping the #MillionsMarchNYC; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Cloudy

What the Internet is not; new analysis of public opinion on net neutrality; how cloud backup apparently foiled a police coverup; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Records

Is the future of citizen journalism vigilantism?; one tech mogul's vocal support for CIA torture; a cri de couer from the founder of the Pirate Bay; and much, much more. GO

Web Index Sees Impact of Net Neutrality, Surveillance and Copyright Laws

Denmark, Finland, Norway, the United Kingdom and Sweden have come out on top of the Web Index, a ranking of the Web Foundation measuring the economic, social and political benefit that countries gain from the web. The United States is at number six. For the authors of the report accompanying the index, the results reflect how inequality has an impact on access to the web. "Nordic policy-makers have been quick to adopt and promote the free Internet - and open access to information - as a 21st century public good," the report states. " Others, as this year's findings show, need to move fast to catch up." The report attributes the Scandinavian countries' advantage to the countries' broader efforts to invest in public goods and establish a welfare and acting against " excess concentrations of wealth and power." With the lower inequality in those countries than in others, "the skills, means and freedoms to benefit from new technologies are widespread, which helps to explain why Scandinavian countries score highly on the political, social and economic impact of the Web GO

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