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First POST: The 16-Year-Old Vote

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, November 5 2013

Some pesky petitions that the White House still hasn't responded to; more evidence of the NSA's violation of Google's and Yahoo's data networks; the new book on Jeff Bezos gets reviewed by his wife MacKenzie Bezos, on Amazon; and much, much more. Read More

Why Didn't Facebook Waive "Sponsored Post" Fees for Hurricane Sandy Relief?

BY Lea Zeltserman | Wednesday, November 7 2012

South Ferry subway station under water, the day after Hurricane Sandy (credit: MTAPhotos)
As the full scope of the disaster wrought by Hurricane Sandy sank in, volunteers in New York and New Jersey dropped everything to help the thousands evacuated from homes that were flooded, freezing and without electricity; many put out urgent calls for supplies and volunteers on Facebook, but their posts failed to reach a wide audience because the social media site did not suspend its fees for promoting posts — even as the New York Times and Wall Street Journal lowered their paywall in order to give people in the disaster-struck region access to information. Read More

Report: Federal Authorities Investigating Break-In Into Mitt Romney's Email Account

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Tuesday, June 5 2012

Federal authorities were notified Tuesday night about an apparent hack into Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney's private email account, according to Gawker, which had been tipped off about the incident. Read More

'Nerds in Parliament:' MEP Marietje Schaake

BY Nick Judd | Friday, June 17 2011

On occasion of the European Union's first Digital Agenda Assembly, the Wall Street Journal's Tech Europe blog today profiles Marietje Schaake, a member of the European Parliament who attributes her election to people she ... Read More

Me and Jon Stewart, On Making Democracy Work

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, November 1 2010

The Wall Street Journal published an essay by me this weekend in their Review section, where I try to look at the big picture of what internet-powered mass participation is doing to politics and governance in America. Read More

News Briefs

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Beyond @Congressedits, Capitol Hill Looks for Entry to Wikipedia

As he recently told techPresident, the creator of Congressedits did not aim to make Members of Congress look bad, but said he hoped that they would recognize the importance of Wikipedia as a public space and engage more with its community. "If staffers and politicians identified as Wikipedians, that would be super. You could imagine politicians' home pages with a list of their recent edits, that they would be proud of the things that they are doing." On Capitol Hill, there is in fact interest in making that vision a reality, starting off with an initial conversation that could create a framework for more Wikipedians in Congress. GO

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In the Philippines, Citizens Go Undercover With Bantay to Monitor Public Offices

The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

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