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The Wacky World of Authoritarian Regimes on Social Media

BY Julia Wetherell | Monday, February 4 2013

Gulnara Karimova's Twitter page.

For many authoritarian states, social media can present the ultimate threat: anti-regime discourse and dissent from the party line. This hasn’t stopped many despots from taking to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Read More

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Reporting from Uzbekistan With a Lens Hidden in Plain Sight

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, November 26 2012

A BBC journalist who recorded interviews with her iPhone and Skype in order to circumvent official restrictions on the media discovered that these tools were so effective in producing broadcast quality content that she no longer needed the bulky conventional equipment, reports Journalism.co.uk. Read More

Tajikistan Launches Internet Censorship, Targeting the Authoritarian President's Online Critics

BY Lisa Goldman | Tuesday, July 24 2012

Another south Asian state of the Former Soviet Union is introducing Internet censorship. Reuters reports that Tajikistan has announced plans to create a volunteer-run body that would monitor the Internet for citizens who criticize President Imomali Rakhmon. The organization has not even been registered yet, but it is already hard at work Read More

New Study on Internet Censorship and Political Activism in Uzbekistan

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, July 20 2012

The government of Uzbekistan's repressive policies coupled with widespread self-censorship are creating a deeply insular society, which makes access to a safe place on the Internet psychologically and ideologically important, posits the author of a new paper. In other words, people are forgetting basic democratic values as they avoid reading anything political, lest they be discovered by government monitors and punished with a loss of personal freedom. Read More

Uzbek Version of Facebook Targets Patriotic Users

BY Lisa Goldman | Thursday, July 12 2012

Global Voices reports on a local version of Facebook recently launched in Uzbekistan. Named YouFace, the site is a private initiative of an Uzbek businessman who says his goal is to “boost patriotism among young people in Uzbekistan.” Responses amongst Uzbeks, based on the tweets collated by the Global Voices author, have so far been mixed. Read More