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WeGov

Philippines Gov't Launches Portal To Transparently Handle Foreign Aid

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, November 25 2013

Hygiene kits and water in the Philippines (Flickr/U.S. Embassy in Manila)

Foreign funds are flooding into the Philippines in the wake of Super-typhoon Haiyan, known in the Philippines as Yolanda. Three days ago the World Bank increased its aid package to nearly US$1 billion. The Asian Development Bank will provide up to US$523 million in assistance. To ensure the funds are used in a responsible manner, the Philippines Department of Budget and Management launched the Foreign Aid Transparency Hub, or FAiTH.

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WeGov

Red Cross Relies on OpenStreetMap in Haiyan Relief Efforts

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, November 13 2013

Screenshot of the OpenStreetMap of Tacloban

Humanitarian organizations are amping up their use of crowdsourcing made possible by the Internet. On Monday, techPresident reported that the United Nations partnership with the Digital Humanitarian Network resulted in groundbreaking use of human computing and machine computing to sift through big data in the aftermath of Super-typhoon Haiyan. In a similar vein, for the first time the Red Cross coordinated their response to Haiyan based on information crowdsourced on OpenStreetMap (OSM).

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WeGov

Digital Humanitarian Response to Super-Typhoon Haiyan

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, November 11 2013

Survivors among the wreckage after Super-typhoon Haiyan (Flickr/EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection)

A devastating super-typhoon with gusts of 200-m.p.h. winds ravaged huge swaths of the Philippines this weekend. Super-typhoon Haiyan (known as Yolanda in the Philippines) is reported to be the strongest recorded storm to ever make landfall. Although the official death toll is now at 1,774, thousands are still missing and a Filipino Presidential spokesman has said they are praying it does not rise about 10,000. Humanitarian organizations have already begun the daunting task of bringing relief to the nearly 10 million people affected by the super storm. In addition to the emergency aid and military personnel flooding into the country, a team of digital humanitarians are also on the job. Patrick Meier reports on his blog iRevolution that for the first time humanitarian response to Typhoon Haiyan makes full use of both human computing and machine computing to understand the big data in the aftermath of disaster.

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