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First POST: Circumlocution and Circumvention

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, March 21 2014

Why everybody is talking about the NSA this morning; how Twitter and its users are responding to a crackdown in Turkey; how the Right is getting better at data-driven campaigns; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Openly Closed

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, March 17 2014

It's Sunshine Week, and the US government is less transparent, says AP; secret-sharing apps like Whisper and Secret are dangerous, says Austin Hill; and taking pictures of people in public now requires their permission, says Hungary; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Turkey: "We Need Internet Censorship, Because Violence Against Women"

BY Jessica McKenzie | Thursday, February 13 2014

A controversial anti-Internet freedom ad from Turkey

The draconian Internet legislation that was working its way through the Turkish government in January passed February 5. To coincide with the new legislation, the Turkish government launched a disturbing advertising campaign that seems to equate a free and open internet with violence. The accompanying picture is of a woman with a bruised eye.

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First POST: Today's Big Disaster

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, February 13 2014

Comcast's bid to buy Time Warner Cable could be a huge disaster for consumers and Internet users in America; the connections between online resistance, state surveillance, and data-driven political targeting; more roundups of The Day We Fight Back; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Realizations

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, February 6 2014

Gearing up the data shops for the 2014 mid-term elections; Silicon Valley moguls want to unseat a Democratic incumbent; is Verizon already violating net neutrality?; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Gaming to Unite a Divided City in Cyprus

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, February 5 2014

The Last Divided Capital (Dan Nevill/Flickr)

After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, Nicosia became the last divided capital in the world. Located on the island of Cyprus, the Greek and Turkish Cypriot sections are separated by a United Nations buffer zone. A new online game allows young Nicosia residents on both sides of the divide to experience—virtually—their city as a whole, and helps them understand their shared history.

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WeGov

"We're Not Like China!" Turkey Bleats, About Censorship Law That Makes Them More Like China

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, January 15 2014

Erdogan poster: "Istanbul is Ready, Target 2023" (Myrat)

The Turkish media outlet Hurriyet Daily News reported that a draft bill by the ruling party contains legislation expanding the government's right to surveil and restrict the Internet. If passed, the government could record and store Internet users' information (browser history, Internet searches, social network activity) for up to two years.

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First POST: Collections

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, January 13 2014

The collection of phone meta-data would not have stopped any terrorist attacks since 9-11, says a New America Foundation study; Christie's aides are hardly the only political hacks using personal email to avoid public records laws; Matthew Burton explains how the CFPB's experience can help other govies make better web products; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Jackpots

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, November 25 2013

How a blog post about being poor set off a cascade of solidarity; why Google's new Civic Information API is a big deal; the rise of the "protest selfie"; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Turkey's Ruling Party Training Social Media Reps to Counter Opposition's Online Presence

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, September 17 2013

They say if you can't beat 'em, join 'em, and it appears that the Turkish government is taking that advice to heart. The ruling Justice and Development Party (or AKP) is training 6,000 social media representatives to counter the strong online presence of the opposition and those who participated in the Gezi protests in June.

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