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Blogging

Someday we'll probably stop talking about bloggers, the same way that no one refers to people who use phones as "phoners." But blogging deserves its own category because the phenomenon so clearly illustrates how the old boundaries between professionals and amateurs have fallen in this age of hyper-connection and hyper-empowerment. Political bloggers in particular are of special interest because of their ability to nurture communities of readers, followers and participants. The rise of the political blogosphere has disrupted traditional politics and journalism, and also presents some complicated challenges for the law. Below, a selection of our best coverage on bloggers, blogging, bloggers rights and sometimes, their wrongs.

In Oregon, Bloggers Aren't Journalists, Federal Judge Rules

BY Sarah Lai Stirland | Wednesday, December 7 2011

A Montana real estate agent in legal hot water for allegedly defamatory statements made on her blog isn't a journalist as defined by Oregon law, a federal district court judge has ruled. Read More

Are Blogs Done For?

BY Nancy Scola | Wednesday, July 7 2010

Via Jason Kottke, what we once might have blogged, now we tweet or status update: Read More

Blogs Are the New Back Fences--Especially for People of Color, Pew Study Shows

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, June 15 2010

Research released last week by the Pew Internet & American Life Project indicates that the blogosphere is bringing people of color into conversations about neighborhood issues. According to the study, people of color ... Read More

Are bloggers press? The LAPD doesn't seem to think so

BY Morra Aarons-Mele | Wednesday, January 30 2008

I understand with every new medium there are some growing pains. There is debate to be had over which entities can call themselves "media" and which are not. Over what constitutes a "legitimate" news or information ... Read More

Blogging While Female

BY Morra Aarons-Mele | Monday, August 6 2007

Gender is seeping into discussion of the netroots in a major way. As today’s Washington Post quotes Yearly Kos Executive Director Gina Cooper on her conference: "It's mostly white. More male than female," says the ... Read More

Are Bloggers the New Pamphleteers?

BY Ari Melber | Monday, October 30 2006

Many people have compared bloggers to the pamphleteers who wrote political screeds during the American revolution. A new venture is taking that idea a step futher, turning a few bloggers into literal pamphleteers by ... Read More

"Elite Bloggers" and the Read-Write Web

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, June 22 2006

Is there such a thing as an "elite blogger"? That's the question I'm mulling as I read through the storm of posts in the political blogs--right, left and center--that are discussing whether Markos Moulitsas and Jerome ... Read More

DOCUMENT: Online Coalition Response to FEC

BY Mike Krempasky | Wednesday, June 1 2005

The Online Coalition is pleased to release our official comment to the Federal Election Commission in response to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding political activity on the internet. This comment will be ... Read More

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In the Philippines, Citizens Go Undercover With Bantay to Monitor Public Offices

The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

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NYC Open Data Advocates Focus on Quality And Value Over Quantity

The New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications plans to publish more than double the amount of datasets this year than it published to the portal last year, new Commissioner Anne Roest wrote last week in an annual report mandated by the city's open data law, with 135 datasets scheduled to be released this year, and almost 100 more to come in 2015. But as preparations are underway for City Council open data oversight hearings in the fall, what matters more to advocates than the absolute number of the datasets is their quality. GO

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