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First POST: Impacts

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, February 9 2015

Why it's a bad idea to ban strong encryption; lessons from the rollout of Google Fiber in Kansas City; lessons from the first five years of Code for America; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Watching the Detectives

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, August 14 2014

The whole world is watching the confrontation between police and protesters in Ferguson, MO, thanks to the web; Twitter finally promises to improve its policies for reducing harassment of users in the wake of Robin Williams' death; how the new US Digital Service hopes to avoid future IT catastrophes; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Disruptors

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, May 20 2014

How the NSA collects every phone call made in the Bahamas; why the FCC's proposed rulemaking on net neutrality is problematic; how Mayor Bill de Blasio plans to upgrade NYC's broadband; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Vitam Et Bello

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, February 5 2014

The British government is reportedly using DDOS against Anonymous; the chair of the House Intelligence Committee seems to think professional journalism equals thievery; Syria's opposition activists are losing their Facebook pages; and much, much more. Read More

Ruck.us Dies Down; Yet Another Political Social Network Goes Bust

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, December 4 2013

For two years now, Ruck.us, the political social network start-up founded by political scions Nathan Dasche (aka Abu Tom, former Senate majority leader), and Raymond Glendening (aka Abu Parris, former Maryland governor) has gotten an unearned and adoring press from the usual places. But today, it's announcing a pivot, away from being a political social network for independent voters, and toward being a digital toolkit for political candidates. Read More

First POST: Taking Over

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, November 26 2013

How privacy concerns will fit into the next populist wave in US politics; Glenn Greenwald and Paul Carr spar; why the number of lobbyists in Washington is probably double what you think; and much, much more. Read More

Why "Gender 50/50" Is An Important Challenge and Commitment for the Tech Industry

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, April 23 2013

Credit @adriarichards

It's 2013, and while some big tech conferences like Social Media Week are rolling out commitments to move toward real gender balance in their speaker mix, others like TechCrunch Disrupt are still reproducing the male-dominated events that dominate the field. What does it take for things to change? Read More

[OP-ED] 20 Most Innovative "People" in Democracy, or 20 Most Innovative Men?

BY Katrin Verclas and Lina Srivastava | Friday, November 9 2012

TechCrunch recently published a list titled “The 20 Most Innovative People in Democracy 2012.” The people named on the list are very good, and truly are at the forefront of changing the landscape of governance, media, and technology, primarily in the U.S. But as a list, it’s only good if author Gregory Ferenstein had titled it “The 20 Most Innovative Men in Democracy 2012.” Read More

No, That Research Does Not Suggest Online Voter Registration Could Reduce Turnout

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, August 29 2012

Research described yesterday as indicating that online voter registration could reduce turnout actually says nothing of the sort. Read More

Daily Digest: Goodbye Rudy, Tuesday

BY Joshua Levy | Tuesday, January 29 2008

TechCrunch announces the winners of its primaries; Barack Obama has pulled in $4 million over the weekend; video of Obama's SC speech beats out Britney in popularity; a new site, the Washington Independent, offers a new ... Read More