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First POST: Command Lines

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, January 14 2015

The White House embraces community broadband; how facial recognition software is getting used to predict voting behavior; understanding how blockchain technology could change the world; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Turbulence

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, January 13 2015

Why David Cameron's call to ban encrypted communications in the UK is stupid and unworkable; what "democracy in the digital age" might look like; the open data movement's turbulent teenage years in the US; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

The Uncertain Future of India's Plan to Biometrically Identify Everyone

BY Jessica McKenzie | Thursday, August 28 2014

Biometric data collection in Howrah, India (Photo: Biswarup Ganguly)

Since its launch in 2010, people in India have raised a number of questions and concerns about the Aadhaar card —formally known as Unique Identification (UID)— citing its effects on privacy rights, potential security flaws, and failures in functionality. Read More

WeGov

Beyond Property Rights: Thinking About Moral Definitions of Openness

BY David Eaves | Tuesday, August 6 2013

Should our definition of "open" information stop at whatever a property owner says, or are there ways to expand the definition to encompass uses that may embody moral rights in addition to property rights? These aren't abstract questions, as WeGov columnist David Eaves discovers in a conversation with one of India's leading Internet activists, Sunil Abraham. Read More

WeGov

In India, Your Facebook Status Could Get You Arrested

BY Lisa Goldman | Wednesday, November 21 2012

Often described as the world's largest democracy, India's legislation on free speech would probably surprise the average American. Vague wording of laws that define defamation issues and hate speech, for example, have affected freedom of expression on the Internet — perhaps most notably, on social media platforms. As the New York Times India edition reports, there have been several cases of otherwise law-abiding citizens being arrested and even jailed for their tweets and status updates. Most recently, two women were arrested for Facebook updates. Read More