You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

First POST: Unequal Relationships

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, July 11 2014

A rush to legislate new data collection law in the UK is drawing pushback; how the cellphone unlocking movement is a great example of "internet activism"; why journalists should fear Facebook; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

In Sudan, Civil Society says It's Struggling to Work Around US Sanctions' Block on Tech

BY Amanda Sperber | Tuesday, January 14 2014

In Sudan, going online only yields a slew of inaccessible pages (credit: UNAMID Photo/flickr)

In Sudan, you cannot download an app via Google play, or update software. No transactions can take place over the Internet because you cannot use a credit card. You can't order a book, a computer or buy music. Transferring money to Sudan from the US is also close to impossible, including in times of crisis, like the massive flooding in August 2013, when some in the diaspora tried sending money to give family back home assistance. US sanctions have blocked a number of products in Sudan, including vital technology tools, and while they tried to ease web restrictions in 2010, it has not improved the situation in Sudan.

Read More

WeGov

Young Sudanese, 'Hungry' for Change, Take Up Crisis Mapping and Blogging

BY Amanda Sperber | Thursday, August 29 2013

Screenshot of the Facebook page for civil society initiative, Nafeer (Nafeer/Facebook)

You can’t use a credit card anywhere in Sudan, but that national hindrance doesn’t really compare to the situation in Darfur, the extreme poverty and the repressive authoritarian government headed by International Criminal Court indicted Omar al-Bashir. Despite or perhaps because of this, Sudan is seeing a small, but strong and steady growth of activism and mobilization through tech. Read More

Social Media's Potential to Transform the Face of Conflict in Developing Nations

BY Lisa Goldman | Wednesday, July 25 2012

It's already a truism that social media holds immense power to raise public awareness of events or fill in knowledge gaps. Now two Harvard doctoral candidates outline how it can transform the face of conflict in Africa and other developing countries — for good and for bad — in an article published on CNN's Global Public Square blog. Read More

As Protests in Sudan Spread, Reports of Teargas and Arrests On Twitter First

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, July 9 2012

Despite the growing momentum of the protest movement, the violent response of security forces, arrests of journalists and activists and media censorship, the Sudanese uprising has so far failed to capture the world's attention. Instead, it is largely covered by young Sudanese who tweet and blog in Arabic and English, using the hashtag #sudanrevolts. Read More

Activists Are Hoping to Mobilize Sudanese Diaspora With Online "Elbow-Licking Friday"

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, June 29 2012

A Sudanese expatriate in Sweden supporting protesters. Photo: @midanfini

Popular protests against Sudan's authoritarian regime are now in their second week, with demonstrations that began in Khartoum spreading across the country. Sudan Change Now 2012 is mapping the demonstrations here. Read More

WeGov

Reporter Detained in Sudan After Posting YouTube Video of Khartoum Protests

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, June 22 2012

Protesters at an anti-government protest in Khartoum, Sudan

For the sixth day in a row, Khartoum university students were out protesting massive increases in the price of meals and transportation that stem from new government austerity measures. Reporters and activists on the ground in Sudan say the size of the protests are clearly worrying the government of Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir — and government forces are cracking down, attempting to limit people's ability to publish video and photos from a political moment that some are debating whether or not to call the arrival of the Arab Spring in Sudan. Efforts to capture images of the unrest, they say, are being hampered by government forces, including the brief detention of one reporter who posted video to YouTube. Read More

Digital Diplomacy, Continued

BY Nick Judd | Friday, November 11 2011

Jimmy Leach, the head of digital engagement for the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office, writes in to say there's a difference between message and medium when it comes to officials and blogs. Earlier this week, I ... Read More

In Diplomacy, Apparently There Are Some Things Online You Can't Un-Say [UPDATED]

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, November 8 2011

In October, British ambassador to Sudan Nicholas Kay published a blog post on his official blog that tackled hunger in Sudan head-on. "How do you celebrate World Food Day in a country where hunger stalks the land?" he ... Read More

If a New Country Comes to Africa and Google Doesn't Map It, Does It Still Exist?

BY Nick Judd | Friday, September 23 2011

South Sudan as it now appears in Google Earth. After the U.N. recognized the Republic of South Sudan as a member state, Google has added it to Google Maps and Google Earth. South Sudan remained off the the map for well ... Read More