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First POST: Exposures

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, April 6 2015

Hispanic by marriage?; Americans (some of them at least) think Snowden runs Wikileaks; when people need food, not 3D printers; convictions for retweets and likes; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Waking Up

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, March 31 2015

Hillary Clinton's deleted emails might not be as gone as she thinks; people making decisions about encryption know nothing about encryption; Meerkat is dead (already); finding out that Facebook filters the newsfeed is, to some like waking up in the Matrix; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Impacts

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, February 9 2015

Why it's a bad idea to ban strong encryption; lessons from the rollout of Google Fiber in Kansas City; lessons from the first five years of Code for America; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Recaps

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, January 12 2015

Previewing the State of the Union's tech topics; data-driven campaigns go after the under-18 vote; open data activist Carl Malamud's renewed campaign to liberate the law; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Upvoted

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, October 8 2014

Why Twitter is suing the US government; are Republican campaign videos really dominating the 2014 race; how Facebook is handling the take-down wars between Ukrainian and Russian activists; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

How Tech-Savvy Podemos Became One of Spain’s Most Popular Parties in 100 Days

BY Carola Frediani | Monday, August 11 2014

The Podemos banner asks, "When is the last time you voted with hope?" (Podemos Uvieu/flickr)

Podemos (“We Can”), a new Spanish party established in March 2014, disrupted their nation’s political scene when it swept up five seats out of 54 and 1.2 million votes (8% of the total) in the European elections in May even though it was only 100-days-old. With 704,585 likes on Facebook and 321,000 followers on Twitter, it has more online fans than any other Spanish political party.

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First POST: Astonishing

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, July 31 2014

Debating how (or if) Twitter should police abusive behavior; Facebook launches Internet.org; an update on the Detroit Water Project; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Spanish Politicians Call For More Censored Net After Political Assassination

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, May 19 2014

Isabel Carrasco did not die because of social media. The Spanish politician was murdered by a 55 year old woman who blamed Carrasco for her daughter's dismissal from the León provincial council in 2011, a snub that was dragged out for years in court over a payment dispute that was eventually decided in the council's favor just days before the murder took place. It is clearly a straightforward, if deranged and poorly planned, revenge killing. Why it has led Spanish politicians to call for the policing of social media is more of a mystery.

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WeGov

Amidst General Distrust of Politics, the Socialist Party of Catalonia Takes Babysteps Towards Transparency

BY Antonella Napolitano | Wednesday, January 15 2014

A screenshot of the homepage of the website Espai Obert ("Open Space" in Catalan language)

The Socialist Party of Catalonia (PSC) has launched a transparency portal, dubbing itself “the first open party of Barcelona.” This is part of an effort to renew the organization and perception of the party in a context of profound distrust toward politics in the whole country, after several big corruption scandals that involved the Prime Minister and, lately, also the Spanish Royal Family. Will the new website be enough? Read More

WeGov

Quién Manda: A Pinterest For Politician and Lobbyist Relations?

BY Rebecca Chao | Tuesday, October 8 2013

http://quienmanda.es/

Some day, the term ‘El Fotomandón’ may give Spanish politicians the jitters. El Fotomandón is, in some sense, like a paparazzi meets Pinterest for politician and lobbyist relations, displaying photos of them interacting together. These so-called ‘protagonistas’ are tagged with their full name and titles. It belongs to the site, Quién Manda (‘Who’s Your Boss?’), launched today by Civio, a civil interest group that works on transparency issues in Spain. Its mantra is to bid ‘bye, bye to opacity’ and ‘hello to democracy.’ Read More