You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

[Op-Ed] Full Spectrum Open Data

BY Matt Stempeck | Thursday, February 12 2015

Transparency and open government advocates have been successful in convincing governments around the world to share some of their data with society at large. (And thanks to the Sunlight Foundation, we'll soon know which data they're not sharing, as well). But there is plenty of important civic information that isn't collected or maintained by governments. We need to supplement open government data with data from others to give nonprofits, governments, and researchers a more holistic understanding of reality.

Read More

First POST: Astonishing

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, July 31 2014

Debating how (or if) Twitter should police abusive behavior; Facebook launches Internet.org; an update on the Detroit Water Project; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Singapore Outlines Plans to Become First "Smart Nation"

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, June 18 2014

Marina Bay, Singapore (Wikipedia)

Forget smart cities; Singapore has announced detailed plans on how they will become the world's first “smart nation.” The Infocomm Development Authority (IDA) revealed their scheme at the CommunicAsia trade show yesterday by having a remote controlled quadcopter deliver a computer to an IDA representative onstage.

Read More

First POST: Power Shifts

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, June 3 2014

#ResetTheNet starts to gain momentum; how Facebook could tilt an election; #BringBackOurGirls gets banned in Nigeria; and much, much more. Read More

WeGov

Weekly Readings: Out-Innovated

BY Antonella Napolitano and Rebecca Chao | Monday, June 2 2014

China goes all out to block Google; online outrage against violence against women in both China and India; Russia's newfound allergy to digital currency; is Africa out-innovating Silicon Valley?; and much more. Read More

WeGov

The Singapore “Media Destruction Authority” Smothers Homegrown News Site

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, January 6 2014

kitchen closed

When techPresident covered Singapore's new media regulations last June, only 10 websites had been singled out by the Media Development Authority (MDA), all big corporate news sites. Fast forward six months to the death-by-paperwork demise of start up citizen news site Breakfast Network, which closed “company” doors on December 16. The MDA's effective smothering of the Breakfast Network team has led one blogger to suggest they change their name to the Media Destruction Authority.

Read More

WeGov

Coding for a Greener, Safer China

BY Rebecca Chao | Friday, July 26 2013

Coding for Green Life Hackathoners (image: Sunny Gao)

Concerned techies in China have developed a number of "green" applications to help their city breathe, eat and access public services more easily. Read More

WeGov

In Singapore, OneMap is One Stop Shop for Public Services and Gov't Agencies

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, June 10 2013

Screenshot of the OneMap showing traffic speeds, incidents and alerts

The government agency Singapore Land Authority launched OneMap – “Singapore's very own version of Google Maps, but with a difference” – in April 2010. The platform was designed so government agencies could share geospatial information with the public. Over time, the platform has been adapted for more diverse uses by NGOs and other government organizations.

Read More

WeGov

Singapore Expands Government Control Over Internet News

BY Jessica McKenzie | Monday, June 3 2013

Yahoo! News Singapore is one of 10 sites that must get an individual license in Singapore

As of June 1st, some online sources for Singapore news need an individual license from the government media regulator, the Media Development Authority (MDA). Online news sites are already subject to the Internet Code of Practice, which includes a description of “Prohibited Material.” However, the new License specifies that news sites must remove prohibited content within 24 hours of notification from the MDA.

Read More

[OP-ED] Singapore Doesn't Always Need Internet Censorship to Silence Critics

BY Phil Howard | Tuesday, March 5 2013

Singapore likes to promote itself as a business-friendly country where the government has a soft touch. But by firing a professor known for criticizing the government's censorship strategies, ruling elites have demonstrated that they still have a firm hand in controlling political conversation. It should make U.S. universities rethink their research partnerships with universities in Singapore, because such relationships actually help launder the regime's reputation. Read More