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White House Takes Questions on Twitter

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, July 27 2011

Yesterday afternoon, White House economic adviser Brian Deese went back and forth with Twitter users via the administration's @WhiteHouse account.

In a post on the White House blog, Kori Schulman, deputy director of digital content, summed up some highlights using Storify, a tool that allowed her to present several Twitter posts from different people in a single embeddable widget. Deese, whose official title is deputy director of the national economic council, answered questions about the national debt in a singularly Twitter-centric way — with many abbreviations and links.

Previously, the White House has held question-and-answer sessions with staff in a format where people could ask questions on Twitter but watch responses through streaming video. Judging by what seems to be on White House New Media Director Macon Phillips' mind this morning — noting that one tweet from last night's event generated nearly 9,000 clicks — this format must offer the administration greater a greater reach, even if it sacrifices the ability to deliver longer answers.

The White House promises to host sessions like yesterday's through Friday, at different times of day.

(With Becky Kazansky)

News Briefs

RSS Feed monday >

First POST: Clueless

Why boycotting Indiana isn't the greatest idea; but people and companies are still doing it anyway; "Flak for Slack chaps in yak app hack flap"; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Net Effects

Ballooning digital campaign teams; early registration deadlines kept millions of people from voting in 2012; love letters to Obamacare; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Data-Driven

Get to know Clinton's digital team even better; Ted Cruz election announcement-related fundraising offers peak into the coming data-driven campaign arms race; New York City launches online community engagement pilot program called IdeaScale; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Too Much Information

Will Facebook become the Walmart of News?; Hillary Clinton's digital team; how easy it is to get your hands on 4.6 million license plate scans; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Firsts

Political reporters use Yik Yak to pep up stories about Ted Cruz's campaign announcement; The New York Times, Buzzfeed and National Geographic may agree to let Facebook host their news on its servers; Google fiber users to soon get targeted television ads; and much, much more. GO

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