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White House Takes Questions on Twitter

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, July 27 2011

Yesterday afternoon, White House economic adviser Brian Deese went back and forth with Twitter users via the administration's @WhiteHouse account.

In a post on the White House blog, Kori Schulman, deputy director of digital content, summed up some highlights using Storify, a tool that allowed her to present several Twitter posts from different people in a single embeddable widget. Deese, whose official title is deputy director of the national economic council, answered questions about the national debt in a singularly Twitter-centric way — with many abbreviations and links.

Previously, the White House has held question-and-answer sessions with staff in a format where people could ask questions on Twitter but watch responses through streaming video. Judging by what seems to be on White House New Media Director Macon Phillips' mind this morning — noting that one tweet from last night's event generated nearly 9,000 clicks — this format must offer the administration greater a greater reach, even if it sacrifices the ability to deliver longer answers.

The White House promises to host sessions like yesterday's through Friday, at different times of day.

(With Becky Kazansky)

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