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What Happens to Federal Websites During a Furlough?

BY Nancy Scola | Thursday, April 7 2011

OMB director Jacob Lew's memo today [pdf] to department heads offers guidance, per the Anti-Deficiency Act. In brief, it seems to argue that unless a function provided by a website is essential, down it goes -- even if it actually costs more to pull it down than it would to keep it up and running. (See pages 13 and 14.)

If a site gets pulled, a notice has to go up:

If any part of an agency' s website is available, agencies should include a standard notice on their landing pages that notifies the public of the following: (a) information on the website may not be up to date, (b) transactions submitted via the website might not be processed until appropriations are enacted, and (c) the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted.

More in the memo.

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