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Wandering the U.S.'s 'Food Deserts'

BY Nick Judd | Monday, May 2 2011

The USDA today released a new web application called Food Desert Locator, which provides census tract-level mapping of areas "where a substantial number or share of residents has low access to a supermarket or large grocery store."

This builds on previous work, the Food Environment Atlas, which offered similar information at the county level.

"This new Food Desert Locator will help policy makers, community planners, researchers, and other professionals identify communities where public-private intervention can help make fresh, healthy, and affordable food more readily available to residents," Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said in a press release. "With this and other Web tools, USDA is continuing to support federal government efforts to present complex sets of data in creative, accessible online formats."

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