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Twitter to Name Users Who Ignore What British Courts Don't Want Them to Say

BY Nick Judd | Friday, May 27 2011

Remember the Trafigura affair from 2009? The one where the Guardian newspaper could not report on findings it had concerning the connection between the oil company Trafigura and a 2006 incident where tons of toxic waste was dumped in Ivory Coast? But between the incident surfacing in Parliament, the curiosity of people on Twitter, and the audacity of the folks behind Wikileaks, other people thwarted the gag order coming from British courts that had silenced the Guardian?

Those courts are still wrestling with what to do about it when people on Twitter ignore their orders, especially when it comes to orders against naming people.

And so is Twitter, which is now ready to do some naming of its own — the users who have "used the social-networking website to break privacy injunctions," the Telegraph reports.

(Via Slashdot)

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