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Tim Tagaris is Leaving His Post As SEIU's Internet Director

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, September 15 2011

Tim Tagaris during Ned Lamont's 2006 U.S. Senate run. Photo: Matt Stoller / Flickr

Tim Tagaris, the former Internet director for onetime presidential hopeful Chris Dodd and for Ned Lamont's 2006 U.S. Senate campaign, announced today in an email that he is leaving his current position as head of new media for the Service Employees International Union.

From the email:

Just wanted to drop a quick note to let you know that after 3.5 years, I'll be leaving SEIU at some point in October. It's been a tremendous opportunity to build something new and really attempt to take what we've learned integrating technology on political campaigns into union organizing to give workers a voice on the job.

I look forward to watching the team we've assembled take the work to another level. They're the best, and are without question the hardest part about leaving.

I am not entirely sure what will come next, so if you have any ideas I'd love to hear it. I know that I'll continue with work with Chris Murphy's U.S. Senate campaign in Connecticut and take an extra long peak at professional sports. Otherwise, it's a bit of a mystery.

Under his watch, the SEIU tried new tools, but also a completely new approach; earlier this summer, it became one of the first and probably the first ever major union to hire digital staffers to serve in senior positions at the local level.

This post's headline has been changed.

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