Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Red State AOL

BY Nick Judd | Monday, November 14 2011

AOL users are still largely Republican, Paul Thomasch writes for Reuters, citing this recent poll from Poll Position:

It seems that Republican voters favor AOL over every other email provider, according to a survey of 1,184 registered voters by Poll Position. In fact, about 20 percent of them picked AOL as their preferred email provider, ahead of both Google (18.9 percent) and Yahoo (15.6 percent). Democrats took a completely opposite view, picking Google as their favorite (27.3 percent), followed by Yahoo (15.6 percent). And what about AOL? It didn’t fare well, with only 5 percent of Democrats picking it as the best service.

Thomasch cites Ben Smith's wonderings-aloud about the AOL email address' usual users — who, for Smith, skew towards "big shots," showing another way in which it's hip to be square, as it were — but neither of them have recently brought up how longstanding this meme has been. Way back in 2008, Business Insider noted that AOL.com's front-page poll called the presidential election for Sen. John McCain.

Update: I just pulled this one out of the archives, a 2009 blog post from the social media data mining company Rapleaf. This is the one where Rapleaf checks its own data about people it knows about with an aol.com email address:

  • Nearly 50% of Gmail users are under 25 years of age
  • AOL users tend to be older, with 31% of users being at least 36 years old
  • Yahoo and Hotmail email users have similar age distributions

AOL users are older. So were McCain voters, and so remain Republicans, Smith agrees. Not terribly controversial results there.

News Briefs

RSS Feed friday >

In China, Local Governments Play Whac-a-Mole With Taxi Apps

It seems these days that car-hailing apps exist only to give cities grief. In New York, car sharing start-ups like Lyft ignore labor, safety insurance laws and in China, the situation is no different except in one regard: taxi hailing apps in China are proliferating at a faster rate than in the U.S. In China, however, the taxi system is very much in its infancy and local Chinese governments are struggling to control the proliferation of new apps that flout the law. GO

thursday >

The Uncertain Future of India's Plan to Biometrically Identify Everyone

Since its launch in 2010, people in India have raised a number of questions and concerns about the Aadhaar card —formally known as Unique Identification (UID)— citing its effects on privacy rights, potential security flaws, and failures in functionality. GO

More