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Posting Calendars Ain't Easy, at Least at the CFPB

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, March 25 2011

Posting the calendars of elected officials was one of the earliest calls to come out of the open government movement, but the Consumer Financial Protection Board's Matt Burton suggests one possible reason pick-up has been minimal: "We learned very quickly why interactive leadership calendars are rare: they’re hard." He dives into the technical reasons why they've found it tricky to get CFPB head Elizabeth Warren's daily schedule up online while comporting with existing rules and procedural realities.

Another possible reason: they become political fodder. Warren's online calendar has been in the news just this week, when Wikicountability, the site launched by the Karl Rove-co-founded Crossroads GPS, used Warren's calendar to argue that she "made time for dinner with far-left anti-business journalists such as American Prospect's Bob Kuttner, Mother Jones' David Corn, and DailyKos.com’s Markos Moulitsas" -- though, the implications of it aside, doesn't seem to hold up to scrutiny on its facts.

So there, actually, maybe having the public record was a good thing for Warren, despite the bother.

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