Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Participants Annoyed at How 'Wikileaks' Gitmo Docs Got Out

BY Nancy Scola | Monday, April 25 2011

Pentagon press secretary Geof Morrell

When it comes to Wikileaks, there's the story, and then there's the backstory. Today, you might have noticed, we've seen a sudden deluge of news stories on just who has been held at Guantanamo Bay, based on detainee files. HuffPo's Michael Calderone walks us through how, as far as we the reader can know, news organizations like the New York Times, NPR, the Guardian, and the Washington Post came to possess and make use of more than 700 Gitmo files.

The fight over who had what when, and was supposed to use it how, is leading to some especially hard feelings, including between folks who once got along. The gist seemed to be, "Is there no decency anymore?" Over here we have Wikileaks (presumably Julian Assange), tweeting annoyance over former colleague Daniel Domscheit-Berg's alleged sneakiness.
"Domschiet, NYT, Guardian, attempted Gitmo spoiler against our 8 group coalition," tweeted the Wikileaks account. "We had intel on them and published first." And over there we have Pentagon press secretary and former NBC correspondent Geoff Morrell complaining about the New York Times' Easter offensive. "Thx to Wikileaks we spent Easter weekend dealing w/NYT & other news orgs publishing leaked classified GTMO docs," Morrell tweeted earlier today.

That Wikileaks earns the sarcastic thanks in Morrell's account, considering that Times executive editor Bill Keller says in Calderone's piece that "WikiLeaks is not our source." But I guess it's still a bit easier and less relationship damaging for the Pentagon to go after Assange and company than Keller and his team.

Even in all this rush, news organizations found time to put together visualizations of the Gitmo docs. Here's the New York Times', the Guardian's, and NPR's. (via Ben Smith) The Washington Post gets on the board with a walk-through of the Guantanamo facility.

News Briefs

RSS Feed thursday >

Beyond @Congressedits, Capitol Hill Looks for Entry to Wikipedia

As he recently told techPresident, the creator of Congressedits did not aim to make Members of Congress look bad, but said he hoped that they would recognize the importance of Wikipedia as a public space and engage more with its community. "If staffers and politicians identified as Wikipedians, that would be super. You could imagine politicians' home pages with a list of their recent edits, that they would be proud of the things that they are doing." On Capitol Hill, there is in fact interest in making that vision a reality, starting off with an initial conversation that could create a framework for more Wikipedians in Congress. GO

wednesday >

In the Philippines, Citizens Go Undercover With Bantay to Monitor Public Offices

The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

More