Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

The One Where Greenpeace Claims a World Record By Getting People to Comment on Facebook Ditching Coal

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, April 15 2011

Photo credit: Kim White/Greenpeace

Greenpeace is claiming a Guinness World Record in the 'most Facebook comments in a 24-hour period' with its "Unfriend Coal" campaign directed at the company, an effort that aims to get Facebook Inc. to "drop coal and commit to 100 percent renewable energy, cutting its carbon footprint and helping in the struggle to prevent catastrophic climate change."

Wait, is this really a real thing? After this week's GE tax hoax, one can't be too careful. A search of the Guinness World Records site doesn't turn up anything in that category, though it does reveal record holders in "Most Likes on a Facebook Post" (Lil Wayne) and "Most Fans on Facebook" (Zynga's version of Texas Hold'em Poker), so what Greenpeace has gone after is well within the range of possibilities. Greenpeace puts its record-breaking effort at 80,000 comments over the course of a full day.

Do we file this under useful online action? Well, the quest to break the Facebook record been getting the multi-year Greenpeace campaign much press this week. So there's that. And as for Facebook, a company statement seems to suggest they don't mind the organization's attention: "We continue to find this kind of engagement valuable and look forward (to) working with Greenpeace and others to address key environmental issues, including energy efficiency and renewable energy."

Last week, Facebook anounced that it was launching something called the Open Compute Project, an initiative to "build one of the most efficient computing infrastructures at the lowest possible cost."

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Responding

The aftermath of Ferguson continues to reverberate; how one Senate campaign took advantage of Facebook's micro-targeting tools; the new Congress' tech agenda; and much, much more GO

tuesday >

First POST: Sad Reality

How social media changed the course of the Ferguson story; Ready for Hillary's 3-million-member email list; why Mark Cuban opposes net neutrality rules; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: All Against All

Why Uber isn't "the future" of cities; why journalists lost control of journalism; how Sean Parker is spending his political money; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Power Frames

The differences between "old power" and "new power"; Uber as a new/old power hybrid; debating Clay Shirky's feminist cred; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Creeping

Senator Al Franken's tough questions for Uber's CEO; how the NSA could make its phone metadata program permanent; global privacy groups launch a personal spyware catcher called Detekt; and much, much more. GO

Recreation.gov and other Govt Projects Move Toward Embracing New Digital Approach

A draft request for proposals for the revamping of Recreation.gov will include a requirement that reservation availability data be publicly accessible and that all proposals detail how they will enable third-party sales, as two members of the United States Digital Services have joined the government team overseeing the RFP, meeting some key demands of civic technologists and consumer oriented technology companies. GO

More