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Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom Signs Deal for "Social Media Revolution" Book

BY Nancy Scola | Friday, April 22 2011

Then San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom at Twitter headquarters, June 23, 2010; photo credit: Twitter

In office as lieutenant governor of California all of three and half months, Gavin Newsom has signed a deal to write a book on "the social media revolution and gov," tweeted the former San Francisco mayor yesterday. "The deal’s signed and the ink’s dry!"

"This solution-driven book suggests that we are at the dawn of a revolutionary change in the way government and the people interact," said Penguin Press, Newsom's publisher, as reported by the Sacramento Bee's Capitol Blog.

Given the target release of the work-- winter 2013 -- the SacBee speculates what we might be seeing here is a campaign book for Newsom's next run for office. Newsom makes the likely sort of politician to go that route. He held high-profile press conferences to announce that San Franciscans can tweet in their reports to 311, he tweeted out his official announcement when he decided to run for governor last election, and, as the SacBee points out, he's been called "The Twitter Prince" on the pages of the New York Times. And here's a dollar on the bet that he won't be the last politician to frame his or her viability for high office around a vision for melding technology to government.

You can look at this and think that's a good for participatory government advocates. It doesn't hurt to have people championing your brand because they think it will help get them elected. But you can also put on your worry pants and be concerned that a mainstreaming of the movement, such as it is, could turn 'participatory government advocate' into about as meaningful a term as 'fiscal conservative' is today.

(via @HowardWeaver)

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