Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

How to Organize a Political Community Using Reddit

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, November 11 2011

Every day, half a million people visit the community news site Reddit to share links and filter information. A big chunk of those people go to the site's Politics section, and thousands also participate in "sub-reddits" on everything from anarchism and Americans Elect to Republicans and Ron Paul. Thirty-nine different Occupy groups have sub-reddits on the site, and the main one has nearly 20,000 members.

More than that, Reddit is known as a community website where people often band together to help each other out, not just with sympathetic words or donations of money or services. As techPresident's Nick Judd reported last year ('I Lose Sleep Over Upvotes -- Seriously:' How a Subreddit Became a Social Action) a single 500-word rant about net neutrality by Redditer Eddie Geller rapidly turned into a full-blown political action committee, the Open Source Democracy Foundation.

On our next PdF conference call, Thursday November 17 at 1pm ET, we're going to explore how and why Reddit works this way, with Geller and Erik Martin, the site's general manager. If you have ever wondered how to navigate Reddit's ecosystem, or how to use the site for organizing, you won't want to miss this call. Register here.

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Unimaginable

How social media has changed Hong Kong's democracy movement; what the "sharing economy" isn't; Facebook's apology to LGBTQ users; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Outgassing

How Beijing is throttling expressions of solidarity with the Hong Kong democracy protests; is the DCCC going overboard with its online fundraising tactics?; SumOfUs's innovative new engagement metric; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

With Vision of Internet Magna Carta, Web We Want Campaign Aims To Go Beyond Protest Mode

On Saturday, Tim Berners-Lee reiterated his call for an Internet Magna Carta to ensure the independence and openness of the World Wide Web and protection of user privacy. His remarks were part of the opening of the Web We Want Festival at the Southbank Centre in London, which the Web We Want campaign envisioned as only the start of a year long international process underlying his call to formulate concrete visions for the open web of the future, going beyond protests and the usual advocacy groups. GO

First POST: Lifestyles

Google's CEO on "work-life balance"; how CloudFlare just doubled the size of the encrypted web; Dems like Twitter; Reps like Pinterest; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Showdown

How demonstrators in Hong Kong are using mobile tech to route around government control; will the news penetrate mainland China?; dueling spin from Dems and Reps on which party's tech efforts will matter more in November; and much, much more. GO

friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

First POST: Dogfood

What ethical social networking might look like; can the iPhone promise more privacy?; how Obama did on transparency; and much, much more. GO

More