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How to Organize a Political Community Using Reddit

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, November 11 2011

Every day, half a million people visit the community news site Reddit to share links and filter information. A big chunk of those people go to the site's Politics section, and thousands also participate in "sub-reddits" on everything from anarchism and Americans Elect to Republicans and Ron Paul. Thirty-nine different Occupy groups have sub-reddits on the site, and the main one has nearly 20,000 members.

More than that, Reddit is known as a community website where people often band together to help each other out, not just with sympathetic words or donations of money or services. As techPresident's Nick Judd reported last year ('I Lose Sleep Over Upvotes -- Seriously:' How a Subreddit Became a Social Action) a single 500-word rant about net neutrality by Redditer Eddie Geller rapidly turned into a full-blown political action committee, the Open Source Democracy Foundation.

On our next PdF conference call, Thursday November 17 at 1pm ET, we're going to explore how and why Reddit works this way, with Geller and Erik Martin, the site's general manager. If you have ever wondered how to navigate Reddit's ecosystem, or how to use the site for organizing, you won't want to miss this call. Register here.

News Briefs

RSS Feed friday >

First POST: Overreaching

Why the FCC balked at the Comcast-TimeWarner deal; Sheryl Sandberg wants Hillary Clinton to lean into the White House; the UK's Democracy Club brings a lot more information to election season; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Ownership

"Tell us more about your bog"; the shrinking role of public participation on campaign websites; "Aaron's Law" has been reintroduced in Congress; is the Comcast-TimeWarner merger on its last legs?; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Bush League

Presidential candidates hiding behind Super PACs; what this means for American democracy; demos at the White House; a demand for Facebook to be more open about news in the newsfeed; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Glass Half Full

A new Pew study on open government data in the US; the FOIA exemption ruffling transparency advocates' feathers; social media bot farms; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Zucked Up

Mark Zuckerberg responds to criticism of "zero rating" Facebook access in India; turning TVs into computers; how Facebook is changing the way UK users see the upcoming General Election; BuzzFeed's split priorities; a new website for "right-of-center women"; and much, much more. GO

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