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Facebook To Wipe Pages Of Inmates Who Update From Behind Bars

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, August 10 2011

Prison inmates in California who use Facebook from behind bars may have their profiles wiped, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation announced today. (Via CBS News)

Facebook has agreed to remove accounts set up or monitored by, or for, an inmate, according to a CDCR press release. Such accounts are a violation of the social network's user policies, according to the release, and they can make it easier for people behind bars to threaten victims or make unwanted sexual advances.

Inmates can have a Facebook profile before incarceration, but aren't supposed to use the social network from behind bars. Increasingly, though, people in jail are getting access to the Internet when they shouldn't be able to. California corrections officials have noted a marked increase in the number of mobile devices used by prisoners — officers confiscated more than 7,200 mobile phones behind bars in the first six months of this year, according to the release, compared with 261 in 2006.

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