Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Chicago CTO Says Senior Municipal Staff are Changing the Way Cities Work

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, June 28 2011

Chicago at night. Photo: Rhys Asplundh / Flickr

Mayors across the United States are tasking senior staffers with changing the way their cities work, Chicago Chief Technology Officer John Tolva said during an interview with Gov 2.0 advocates Adriel Hampton and Allison Hornery that was released today.

With city Chief Data Officer Brett Goldstein, Tolva said, he's in Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office. For him, that's a crucial point — and he says it's part of a nationwide wisening-up on the part of city executives.

"Just as Nigel Jacob at the Office of New Urban Mechanics sits in the mayor's office, just as Rachel Sterne sits in the mayor's office in New York, I think what you're seeing in the last 18 months is an understanding of city executives that technology and the kind of innovations that it can foment deserve a seat at the table, deserves a seat at his or her table, and yet having a tight connection to the more operational aspects of city IT."

The unique thing about the Sternes and Jacobs and Tolvas of the world is that they aren't focused on things like data centers or collaboration platforms, except when they are means to an end. The real focus is on updating the way cities do business to keep them competitive in the 21st century, Tolva said.

"Part of this is old-school business consulting, or business process transformation," Tolva said. "It has nothing to do with technology per se, except that we've been given the mandate to use technology behind the scenes to smooth out the process."

"If it was broken on paper," he said at another point in the interview, "it's probably going to be even more broken if all you do is digitize that process."

Jacob, a former software developmer, is Boston Mayor Thomas Menino's in-house innovation guy. At Boston's City Hall, he's focused on initiatives that seek to modify everything from urban planning to waste management to make them more transparent and interactive for citizens. Sterne's title in New York City government is chief digital officer — and she is the first person to hold that position. Working from the Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, she leads the charge on an initiative to change the way the city interacts online, consolidating its social media presences, making more intelligent use of new tools like location-based services, and positioning the city as a leader in the Internet age. As someone who is well connected in the city's burgeoning Internet technology industry, which is a priority for New York's Economic Development Corporation, Sterne is also one of the city's top ambassadors to Gotham geekdom. Whenever Mayor Michael Bloomberg appears at a New York-based tech company, Sterne is likely to be nearby. Both began in their current capacities within the 18-month timeframe Tolva identifies.

Formerly IBM's director of citizenship and technology, Tolva is well-connected in Chicago's technology world. His circle is the same one that encompasses Everyblock co-founders Adrian Holovaty (also a co-creator of the Python web development framework Django) and Daniel X. O'Neil.

Transparency and Public Shaming: Pakistan Tackles Tax Evasion

In Pakistan, where only one in 200 citizens files their income tax return, authorities published a directory of taxpayers' details for the first time. Officials explained the decision as an attempt to shame defaulters into paying up.

GO

wednesday >

Facebook Seeks Approval as Financial Service in Ireland. Is the Developing World Next?

On April 13 the Financial Times reported that Facebook is only weeks away from being approved as a financial service in Ireland. Is this foray into e-money motivated by Facebook's desire to conquer the developing world before other corporate Internet giants do? Maybe.

GO

The Rise and Fall of Iran's “Blogestan”

The robust community of Iranian bloggers—sometimes nicknamed “Blogestan”—has shrunk since its heyday between 2002 – 2010. “Whither Blogestan,” a recent report from the University of Pennsylvania's Iran Media Program sought to find out how and why. The researchers performed a web crawling analysis of Blogestan, survey 165 Persian blog users, and conducted 20 interviews with influential bloggers in the Persian community. They found multiple causes of the decline in blogging, including increased social media use and interference from authorities.

GO

tuesday >

Weekly Readings: What the Govt Wants to Know

A roundup of interesting reads and stories from around the web. GO

Russia to Treat Bloggers Like Mass Media Because "the F*cking Journalists Won't Stop Writing"

The worldwide debate over who is and who isn't a journalist has raged since digital media made it much easier for citizen journalists and other “amateurs” to compete with the big guys. In the United States, journalists are entitled to certain protections under the law, such as the right to confidential sources. As such, many argue that blogging should qualify as journalism because independent writers deserve the same legal protections as corporate employees. In Russia, however, earning a place equal to mass media means additional regulations and obligations, which some say will lead to the repression of free speech.

GO

Politics for People: Demanding Transparent and Ethical Lobbying in the EU

Today the Alliance for Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Regulation (ALTER-EU) launched a campaign called Politics for People that asks candidates for the European Parliament to pledge to stand up to secretive industry lobbyists and to advocate for transparency. The Politics for People website connects voters with information about their MEP candidates and encourages them to reach out on Facebook, Twitter or by email to ask them to sign the pledge.

GO

monday >

Security Agencies Given Full Access to Telecom Data Even Though "All Lebanese Can Not Be Suspects"

In late March, Lebanese government ministers granted security agencies unrestricted access to telecommunications data in spite of some ministers objections that it violates privacy rights. Global Voices reports that the policy violates Lebanon's existing surveillance and privacy law, Law 140, but has gotten little coverage from the country's mainstream media.

GO

More