Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

BigGovernment.com Videos Trigger Resignation of University of Missouri Labor Lecturer

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, May 3 2011

It hasn't gotten the attention of the Shirley Sherrod  incident, but videos posted to Andrew Breitbart's Big Government site have led to another job loss. St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Tim Barker reports:

A University of Missouri-St. Louis lecturer has resigned following criticism of his role in a class dealing with labor unions, politics and society.

The issue popped up after the biggovernment.com website published a pair of heavily edited videos in which the lecturer, Don Giljum, appears to talk about using violence and intimidation in labor negotiations.

Media Matters says the videos of Giljum were edited to the point of distortion. Earlier today, Giljum and a Big Government blogger were arrested in a hallway skirmish.

News Briefs

RSS Feed friday >

First POST: Scary Monsters

Facebook opens up about its experiments on tweaking voting behavior; breaking news in the FCC net neutrality battle; getting hard data on civic tech's impact on political efficacy; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: System-Gaming

Why techies interested in political reform are facing challenges; the latest data on Democratic voter contacts in 2014; Hungary's anti-Internet tax demonstrations are getting huge; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Gimme Shelter

The link between intimate partner violence and surveillance tech; the operational security set-up that connected Laura Poitras, Glenn Greenwald and Edward Snowden; how Senate Dems are counting on tech to hold their majority; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Tribes

Edward Snowden on the Internet's impact on political polarization; trying to discern Hillary Clinton's position on NSA reform; why Microsoft is bullish on civic tech; and much, much more GO

monday >

First POST: Inventions

How voter data-sharing among GOP heavyweights is still lagging; why Facebook's News Feed scares news publishers; Google's ties to the State Department; and much, much more. GO

More