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BigGovernment.com Videos Trigger Resignation of University of Missouri Labor Lecturer

BY Nancy Scola | Tuesday, May 3 2011

It hasn't gotten the attention of the Shirley Sherrod  incident, but videos posted to Andrew Breitbart's Big Government site have led to another job loss. St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Tim Barker reports:

A University of Missouri-St. Louis lecturer has resigned following criticism of his role in a class dealing with labor unions, politics and society.

The issue popped up after the biggovernment.com website published a pair of heavily edited videos in which the lecturer, Don Giljum, appears to talk about using violence and intimidation in labor negotiations.

Media Matters says the videos of Giljum were edited to the point of distortion. Earlier today, Giljum and a Big Government blogger were arrested in a hallway skirmish.

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