Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

From All Sides, Online Pushes to Scrap the Deal

BY Nick Judd | Monday, August 1 2011

As members of Congress gather in Washington ahead of a vote on the controversial debt deal, all sides of this argument are urging action online — and for most of them, it's a call to scuttle the deal.

Conservatives

Headlines on Heritage Action for America's website, a political action site associated with the Heritage Foundation, include petitions opposing any deal that contains tax increases and another reiterating support for House Speaker John Boehner's initial "Cut, Cap and Balance" deal, which has already been left aside as lacking enough support to pass the Senate. A FreedomWorks call to action asking people to call their representatives in opposition to anything except the "Cut, Cap and Balance" deal has a log with comments from people who say they called as recently as a few hours ago. The Tea Party Patriots have a site, NoDebtIncrease.com, opposing any increase to the debt ceiling. (That one reports 60,000 signatures.)

Progressives

Progressive Change Campaign Committee co-founder Adam Green sent along a statement to reporters today calling the current debt proposal "an attack on middle-class families" and promising that PCCC members will put in "thousands" of calls to Congress today with the help of a website that provides a script and a number. Calling a proposed bicameral, bipartisan debt committee a "Super Congress," FiredogLake is asking readers to call their members of Congress in opposition. The Service Employees International Union's 1-877 number connecting people to their U.S. Senator is open, with a nudge towards asking electeds to oppose cuts to Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security. And while not necessarily possessed of a political bent, we found this site, built by the web firm Notion Collective, which applies a circa-2011-web-design approach to explaining the debt ceiling and suggesting that, maybe, folks should be hoping the debt ceiling is raised and the country continues to be able to borrow money to meet obligations.

Obama for America, of course, is fighting back: President Barack Obama's re-election effort sent out a message to supporters today with a link to a video of the president explaining his position on the debt deal.

"The President and congressional leaders reached an agreement last night to meet our financial obligations and reduce our deficit," goes the text of the email, signed by OFA Campaign Manager Jim Messina. "Many people will have lots to say about this deal -- but the President wanted to talk to you directly."

(With Becky Kazansky)

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Unimaginable

How social media has changed Hong Kong's democracy movement; what the "sharing economy" isn't; Facebook's apology to LGBTQ users; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Outgassing

How Beijing is throttling expressions of solidarity with the Hong Kong democracy protests; is the DCCC going overboard with its online fundraising tactics?; SumOfUs's innovative new engagement metric; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

With Vision of Internet Magna Carta, Web We Want Campaign Aims To Go Beyond Protest Mode

On Saturday, Tim Berners-Lee reiterated his call for an Internet Magna Carta to ensure the independence and openness of the World Wide Web and protection of user privacy. His remarks were part of the opening of the Web We Want Festival at the Southbank Centre in London, which the Web We Want campaign envisioned as only the start of a year long international process underlying his call to formulate concrete visions for the open web of the future, going beyond protests and the usual advocacy groups. GO

First POST: Lifestyles

Google's CEO on "work-life balance"; how CloudFlare just doubled the size of the encrypted web; Dems like Twitter; Reps like Pinterest; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Showdown

How demonstrators in Hong Kong are using mobile tech to route around government control; will the news penetrate mainland China?; dueling spin from Dems and Reps on which party's tech efforts will matter more in November; and much, much more. GO

friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

First POST: Dogfood

What ethical social networking might look like; can the iPhone promise more privacy?; how Obama did on transparency; and much, much more. GO

More