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Advocating a #Compromise, White House Turns to New Media

BY Nick Judd | Friday, July 29 2011

Source: Trendsmap

As Sen. Kent Konrad (D-N.D.) delivers a staid and very traditional speech on the Senate floor during remarks on the debt ceiling, the White House new media team is going another direction entirely — they have asked Americans to take to Twitter with the hashtag #compromise to urge their electeds to support a deal on the upper limit of the country's ability to borrow money.

Update, 4:46 p.m. Friday: President Barack Obama's campaign account, @Barackobama, has been posting the Twitter handles of every Republican member of Congress, by state, throughout the afternoon.

Tim Tagaris notes that he began the day with 9,396,253 followers. As of right now, @Barackobama now has 9,378,827 followers — meaning that the campaign account has actually lost over 17,000 followers so far. Oh, and that he's also giving his 9-million-plus followers a great chance to join the following of Republican members of Congress.

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