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WeGov

A Russian Meteor, Press Freedom, and the "New Westphalian Web"

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, February 26 2013

When a meteor appeared over the Chelyabinsk region of Russia, it did more than shatter windows and turn heads. The blast — and videos of the meteor taken by the many Russians who carry cameras as protection against more pedestrian hazards like car accidents or corrupt public officials — also rained shrapnel over the debate around music, TV and movie intellectual property in the digital age, linking it once again with questions about what press freedom means in what many think is, or should be, a borderless Internet. Read More

WeGov

The Wacky World of Authoritarian Regimes on Social Media

BY Julia Wetherell | Monday, February 4 2013

Gulnara Karimova's Twitter page.

For many authoritarian states, social media can present the ultimate threat: anti-regime discourse and dissent from the party line. This hasn’t stopped many despots from taking to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Read More

WeGov

Weekly Global Readings: Repression

BY Lisa Goldman | Wednesday, January 9 2013

From today, techPresident will publish a weekly global mashup of stories about the intersection of technology, democracy and civil society. Read More

WeGov

Thawing Relations Between Transparency Activists and Government in Russia Yield Results

BY David Eaves | Monday, December 17 2012

The Russian transparency environment is not without both opportunities and innovations. Legally, there are requirements for government transparency encoded in Russian law — they are however infrequently adhered to. But this does give advocates some legal ground to stand on. And politically, there is opportunity as well. The government is talking more and more about fighting corruption, creating room for both advocates and government officials to talk about how transparency could play a role in addressing this issue. Read More

WeGov

Russia Advocates State Regulation of the Web, Then Pulls Back

BY Julia Wetherell | Tuesday, December 11 2012

WCIT 2012 panel (credit: Flickr/ITU Pictures)

A Russian-led proposal intended to give world governments regulatory power over the Internet has been effectively withdrawn, says the International Telecommunications Union. The plan was presented at the UN World Conference on International Telecommunications, held in Dubai this past week, where members of the ITU are renegotiating an upgrade its 1988 communications treaty. Read More

Russia Using DPI Technology to Implement New Internet Censorship Law

BY Lisa Goldman | Monday, November 5 2012

With Russia's new Internet censorship law going into effect as of the end of October, it emerges that the government plans to enforce it by using some very invasive technology to monitor citizens' online activity. Read More

Striking Similarity Between Obama and Putin Campaign Videos Raises an Eyebrow (or two)

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, October 26 2012

Screenshot: YouTube

An Obama campaign video starring Lena Dunham employs suggestive language that is strikingly reminiscent of a video created for Vladimir Putin's campaign last year. Read More

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To Protest Electoral Corruption, Putin's Opponents Hold Their Own Parliamentary Elections Online

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, October 19 2012

Screenshot of candidates for the "shadow parliament" from their website.

To protest irregularities in the Russian elections, opponents of President Vladimir Putin are putting their time where their Internet is: They are, reports Reuters, "instead holding their own Internet contest to choose a "shadow parliament" they hope will reinvigorate the flagging opposition movement." Read More

WeGov

New iPhone App Allows Reporting of Bribes in Russia

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, October 9 2012

Screenshot from Bribr website.

A group of Russian entrepreneurs have released an iPhone application that encourages the reporting of bribes, the Moscow Times reported. Read More

WeGov

Russia to Restrict Access to Public Free WiFi

BY Lisa Goldman | Friday, October 5 2012

In its latest move to control Internet access, the Russian government plans to put into effect a law that will restrict minors from accessing public, free WiFi. Read More