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The Guns and Gun Data Debate, Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying And Love the End of Privacy

BY Nick Judd | Friday, January 11 2013

Public equals online. We just don't yet understand what that means. Read More

Public Authority Puts Thousands of Freedom of Information Requests Online

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, April 30 2012

Under a new freedom of information code for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey that was set to go into effect April 15, the public authority has released 22,000 pages of documents on the Internet — including every response to a Freedom of Information Act request received in 2011.

Transparency activist John Kaehny, executive director of Reinvent Albany, says this is "great and stupid at the same time."

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In Public Records Fight, Are Reporters And Their Publishers On Opposite Sides?

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, March 28 2012

The Columbia Journalism Review's Steven Waldman notes that a fight over proposed rules that would put records online showing who's paying for local TV ads — including political campaigns — is putting news organizations on one side of the table and their reporters on the other.

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Beyond @Congressedits, Capitol Hill Looks for Entry to Wikipedia

As he recently told techPresident, the creator of Congressedits did not aim to make Members of Congress look bad, but said he hoped that they would recognize the importance of Wikipedia as a public space and engage more with its community. "If staffers and politicians identified as Wikipedians, that would be super. You could imagine politicians' home pages with a list of their recent edits, that they would be proud of the things that they are doing." On Capitol Hill, there is in fact interest in making that vision a reality, starting off with an initial conversation that could create a framework for more Wikipedians in Congress. GO

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In the Philippines, Citizens Go Undercover With Bantay to Monitor Public Offices

The Philippines, a country of almost 100 million, is considered among the most corrupt country in Southeast Asia, despite a boost in Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index in the past few years (from 134th in 2010 to 94th in 2013 out of 175.) Corruption involves all levels of government, but benefits also from a mindset of tolerance, says Happy Feraren, the co-founder of Bantay.ph, an anti-corruption educational initiative that teaches citizens how to monitor the quality of government services, sometimes by going undercover. GO

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