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WeGov

For Crimea, Dangerous Memes (And The Listicles to Combat Them)

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, March 11 2014

Because this definitely happened! (Global Voices)

Could memes be making the situation in Crimea worse?

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WeGov

The Apocalypsticle: Better-Than-Nothing Tabloid Journalism or the Plague of New Media?

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, February 25 2014

Kiev, February 18, 2014 (Аимаина хикари/Wikipedia)

The age old truism “A picture is worth a thousand words” is once again up for debate. Sarah Kendzior, writing for Politico, threw down the gauntlet in the article “The Day We Pretended to Care About Ukraine,” in which she criticizes the use of “apocalypsticles” to cover events in Ukraine as mere clickbait. Emily Bell responded in The Guardian, writing that listicles are valuable precisely because they are accessible, and to criticize a media form for catering to non-elites is “perverse.”

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WeGov

Turkey's Ruling Party Training Social Media Reps to Counter Opposition's Online Presence

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, September 17 2013

They say if you can't beat 'em, join 'em, and it appears that the Turkish government is taking that advice to heart. The ruling Justice and Development Party (or AKP) is training 6,000 social media representatives to counter the strong online presence of the opposition and those who participated in the Gezi protests in June.

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WeGov

Protests in Turkey: Lies, Damn Lies, and Social Media

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, June 3 2013

Mapping tweets around Istanbul. Source: NYU SMaPP

If Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan is to be believed, ongoing protests in Istanbul are thanks in no small part to lies and exaggerations spreading online. "There is now a menace which is called Twitter," Erdogan said on TV, according to the Guardian. "The best examples of lies can be found there. To me, social media is the worst menace to society." While some have suggested that Erdogan has cracked down on Internet access in response, there's no evidence his government has limited connectivity. In fact, initial research suggests that the Turkish protests have spawned a record number of Tweets compared with other protests, spreading not just real-time information about protests, but encouraging others to participate. The uncomfortable truth is that while it's unsurprising to hear a government official denouncing his detractors as misinformed or dishonest, Erdogan isn't entirely wrong. Unverified and in some cases clearly inaccurate information about the protests is spreading fast, and in some cases too rapidly for reliable information to counteract. Read More

WeGov

Now On YouTube: Indigenous Groups Burst Into Brazil’s Congress to Protest Land Rights Bill

BY Jessica McKenzie | Thursday, May 2 2013

Screengrab from political journalist's video of protest on YouTube

After waiting an entire day for an audience with Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies to discuss a controversial bill, hundreds of aboriginal Brazilians bypassed security guards and burst into the session. The disruption was caught live on the Chamber of Deputies TV channel, and later posted on YouTube. A political journalist posted a second, shakier video that shows confusion and chaos during the protest.

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The 'Mic Check' And the Occupiers' Protest Framework

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, November 17 2011

Watch the live video feeds coming from Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in lower Manhattan today and you'll hear, over and over again, a refrain that has come to define the movement: "Mic check!" What began as a way for ... Read More

In Spain, 'Indignados' Continue to Make Demands

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, September 29 2011

Reading up on the doings of the "indignados," a group of Spanish protesters known first for a prolonged occupation of the square in Madrid's Puerta del Sol — in the style of the Jan. 25 protesters who occupied ... Read More

San Francisco Transit Company Spurs Protest With Attempt to Silence Protesters' Mobile Phones

BY Nick Judd | Monday, August 15 2011

The San Francisco Bay Area's commuter rail network, Bay Area Rapid Transit, angered many Thursday when it tried to thwart a protest against it by shutting down cellular service to passengers — prompting an attack ... Read More