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Seven Ideas to Reboot Government Innovation In San Francisco

BY Luke Fretwell | Thursday, January 26 2012

Luke Fretwell writes:

"There’s been a great deal of discussion lately around the topic of government innovation, especially here in San Francisco, with the appointment of a new chief innovation officer, a new “civic accelerator,” a new venture with a consortium of Bay Area technology companies and a new technology and innovation task force led by SF Mayor Ed Lee.

All signs point to a bright gov 2.0 future for SF but, before we get too excited, let’s look back so we can learn how to best overcome the past two years of innovation inertia."

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First POST: Enhancing SOTU

BY Miranda Neubauer | Wednesday, January 25 2012

President Barack Obama and his director of speechwriting, Jon Favreau, on Jan. 23. Photo: Pete Souza / White House

Today in technology and politics:

  • Barack Obama's spilled-milk crack during the State of the Union left Twitter crying.
  • A federal ruling by a judge in Colorado may give law enforcement more leeway to force you to decrypt your electronic devices on request.
  • Julian Assange is planning a TV show.
Click through for our comprehensive look at today's most interesting tech/politics news from around the web. Read More

White House Launches Education.Data.Gov

BY Miranda Neubauer | Monday, January 23 2012

The White House last week announced the launch of education.data.gov as part of the overall data.gov project. The site seeks to target developers, teachers and students. For developers, the site offers access to raw data on kindergarten through grade 12 schools, and enrollment and finance data related to colleges and universities. In addition, the site will highlight competitions for developers to design apps related to education. Read More

Every Bill Coming Before the House Should Soon Be Available Online in Machine-Readable Format

BY Miranda Neubauer | Tuesday, January 17 2012

As of late last week, the House of Representatives began publishing some key legislative documents in machine-readable format at http://docs.house.gov, fulfilling a promise that had been announced last year. Going forward, the site will host a machine-readable version of every bill coming before the House, and currently hosts another structured set of data on all the bills coming before the House in a given week. Read More

Watching Where the Plows Go

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, January 12 2012

The snow is moving in Chicago, and so is the City of Chicago's "Plow Tracker", the first part of its online snow-fighting portal to go live. Read More

Edgeryders: how sharing and collaboration can build a vision for the European young generation

BY Antonella Napolitano | Tuesday, January 10 2012

Edgeryders, a project of the Council of Europe and the European Commission

In times of crisis the younger generation seems to be the one that is and will be most affected and without any clue on how to face unprecedented challenges. The Council of Europe and the European Commission are trying to help them by creating a think tank on youth’s transition to an independent active life. They’re doing in an unusual way, though, with a project where the transition experts are young people themselves. Read More

"Yes We Scan," A Project to Bring the Library of Congress to the Internet

BY Nick Judd | Thursday, December 22 2011

The Center for American Progress' John Podesta and open-government pioneer Carl Malamud are heading up a new effort called Yes We Scan: A call for the federal government to do a better job of digitizing all of Washington's many cultural treasures, from the Library of Congress to the National Technical Information Service, and making them available online. In a letter addressed to President Barack Obama and posted yesterday, Malamud calls on the White House to conduct a comprehensive review of current archiving efforts and come up with a plan on how to proceed from there. Read More

Movement Times: TechPresident's Top Posts of 2011

BY Micah L. Sifry and Nick Judd | Wednesday, December 21 2011

Tahrir Square in February. By Ramy Raoof

From the streets of Tunisia to Wall Street, and online from the WikiLeaks wars to the early election skirmishes of 2012, this has been a tumultuous time. Next year, who knows, maybe everything will just get really boring. Though we kind of doubt it. But in case you missed anything, or just want a refresher on what went down on these pixels, here's our subjective, selective and unrepresentative sampler of the Best of techPresident 2011. Read More

Civic Commons Marketplace, a Resource for Open Source In Government, Enters Closed Beta

BY Nick Judd | Tuesday, December 13 2011

Civic Commons has launched a closed beta of Marketplace, an application that aims to be a resource for people in the open-source civic technology community. First unveiled at Code for America's year-end summit, the marketplace is supposed to be a clearinghouse for information about open-source applications and the organizations that make them. Read More

A New Tool to Crowdsource Legislative Markup Comes From the U.S. House

BY Nick Judd | Wednesday, December 7 2011

In the hopes of attracting the eyeballs — and maybe the comments and revisions — of Internet geeks, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) and Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) plan on Thursday to unveil their alternative to the ... Read More