Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

First POST: Jargon Busters

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, January 28 2015

Changes in the RNC's tech team; big plans for digital democracy in the UK; how people in Cuba are making their own private Internet; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Je Suis Charlie

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, January 7 2015

A murderous attack on journalists in France reverberates worldwide; Jeb Bush revs up his online campaign for 2016; how women's voices are outnumbered online; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Pushbacks

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, January 6 2015

Why time is a more important metric than clicks; how police are criminalizing some social media; Mikhail Khodorkovsky's Open Russia movement; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Security Insecurity

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, November 14 2014

New data on Americans attitudes toward government and private surveillance; how artists are responding to the surveillance state; redesigning New York state's official web presence; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Unimaginable

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, October 2 2014

How social media has changed Hong Kong's democracy movement; what the "sharing economy" isn't; Facebook's apology to LGBTQ users; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Outgassing

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, October 1 2014

How Beijing is throttling expressions of solidarity with the Hong Kong democracy protests; is the DCCC going overboard with its online fundraising tactics?; SumOfUs's innovative new engagement metric; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Wartime

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, September 24 2014

A bizarre online marketing effort targets actress Emma Watson; why the news media needs to defend the privacy of its online readers; Chicago's playbook for civic user testing; and much, much more. Read More

What We Really (Should) Talk About When We Talk About Big Data

BY Jessica McKenzie | Friday, March 7 2014

Corporations don't need census data to guess your race & use it against you (Wikipedia)

Discrimination. Redlining. Racial profiling. These practices predate the Internet, and yet there is every indication that technology can enable infringements on civil rights to an even greater extent than before. Last week, in an effort to put civil rights at the forefront of the ongoing debate about digital privacy and security, a coalition of civil and human rights organizations jointly released “Civil Rights Principles for the Era of Big Data,” five tenets to guide policy-making.

Read More

WeGov

Worried About The NSA? Be Glad You Don't Live In India

BY Jessica McKenzie | Wednesday, September 11 2013

Last week The Economic Times reported that India's massive surveillance apparatus known as the Centralised Monitoring System (CMS) will be “operational soon”—this in spite of the fact that some believed it to be at work as early as May of this year. When CMS finally made headlines, activists worried that India's existing privacy laws wouldn't be enough to protect consumers from snooping government officials abusing their powers. Low and behold—on September 9 The Hindu reported that India's 160 million Internet users are already being thoroughly surveilled, and that the government's activities violate laws meant to ensure “privacy of communications.”

Read More

Can an NSA-Proof Chat Be as Easy As Using Facebook?

BY Sam Roudman | Friday, August 2 2013

Photo: zzpza / Flickr

As it turns out, the government really can watch quite a lot of what you do online — maybe even to a greater degree than lawmakers meant to allow. That's sparking a sudden surge of interest in tools to help people preserve their privacy. There's just one problem: More often than not, those tools are awfully hard to use. Read More

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Upgrades

Obama tech veterans heading to Hillary 2016?; renewed calls for Obama to stop collecting Americans' phone metadata; FCC upgrades its definition of broadband service, finally; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Blogrolling

How Canada spies on its citizens' web behavior; with uber-blogger Andrew Sullivan quitting the field, whither political blogs; how big data is helping prevent homelessness in NYC; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Jargon Busters

Changes in the RNC's tech team; big plans for digital democracy in the UK; how people in Cuba are making their own private Internet; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

First POST: Stalking

How the DEA tracks millions of America motorists; will the Senate enter the 21st century?; Obama veteran Jeremy Bird's role in the upcoming Israeli election; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Video Stars

How the White House hit a home run on YouTube post-State of the Union; why the Barrett Brown sentencing casts a chill on online security research; how media producers use Crowdtangle to optimize their Facebook audiences; and much, much more. GO

More