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First POST: Overdue

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, January 8 2015

Signs that the FCC will reclassify broadband under Title II; why the FBI is sure North Korea hacked Sony; the White House's belated non-reply to Aaron Swartz petitions; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Catch-ups

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, January 5 2015

How to be digitally competitive in the 2016 "invisible primary"; why net neutrality matters to the #BlackLivesMatter movement; how governments are winning the online censorship battle; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Cheers

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, December 24 2014

How to not overreact to the Sony hack; the FCC admits it lost nearly 680,000 open internet comments; a great civic app wish-list; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Dealing

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, December 23 2014

As North Korea's Internet mysteriously goes down, doubts remain about the source of the Sony hack; Facebook's Russia dilemma; some big news in open government data; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Brewing

BY Micah L. Sifry | Monday, December 22 2014

How Democratic tech firms are jockeying for 2016 presidential roles; the FEC inches back into regulating the Internet; why Tumblr is a social justice movement hotbed; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: MonopSony

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, December 19 2014

Debating whether the Sony hack is a national security issue; living in the Age of Outrage; how Black Twitter is changing the civil rights scene; and much, much more. Read More

First POST: Where's the Outrage?

BY Micah L. Sifry | Wednesday, May 7 2014

Is a populist revolt against the loss of net neutrality on the horizon?; how the #BringBackOurGirls hashtag took off; a close look the SF Gives tech anti-poverty initiative; and much, much more. Read More

Coming to Grips With Our Not-So-New Surveillance State

BY Matt Stoller | Tuesday, March 18 2014

An FBI agent collects the agency's one-hundred-millionth fingerprint (National Archives and Records Admin.)

In this op-ed, Matt Stoller looks at the history of surveillance in America and argues that the current conversation about the NSA's massive system of dragnet surveillance is missing perspective. We've been living in surveillance state for decades, he writes, one that has long merged commercial and state snooping into individuals' private lives. And we're not powerless to fight it. Read More

WeGov

#NoFilter: Instagrams Provide Rare, Uncensored Look Inside North Korea

BY Jessica McKenzie | Tuesday, November 5 2013

A man biking in Pyongyang, North Korea (Wikipedia)

North Korea relaxed many of their rules and restrictions imposed on visiting foreigners this year. In January the country began allowing foreigners to carry cell phones, and in February it even activated a 3G network, although that was later revoked in March. Now millions of North Koreans use a 3G network, but are banned from using it to access the Internet or to make international phone calls. Foreigners still have easier access to wi-fi connections. One Associated Press photographer named David Guttenfelder regularly uploads uncensored images to his Instagram account, providing a rare look into a country once virtually unknown.

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The Top Tech-Politics Developments of 2013, So Far

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, August 1 2013

Every six months or so, we add more items to our "Politics and the Internet" Timeline, a living document that now includes more than 160 items stretching back to 1968 and covering a range of domestic, international and online events. Keep in mind, this isn't an official list but just our best subjective judgment on the most important developments at the intersection of technology and politics. If you would like to suggest something that we've left out, or make a correction to the record, please use this form. After the jump--Here's what we've added for the period from January 2013 to the end of July: Read More