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Hashtags: The New New Way to Organize the World

BY Nancy Scola | Thursday, October 2 2008

Back in my day, if you had a bright idea, you planted a flag for it by registering a domain name. But that time has passed, my friends. These days, even more important than a website seems to be picking a humble Twitter hashtag to define a political meme. Then you throw it out into the world and seeing if it has any stickiness. Good ones can evolve out of Twitter to the rest of the web and world, portable from Twitter to RSS streams to, yes, domain names to blog post tags. Hashtags are kinda like OpenID for ideas.

Some political hashtags have already proven themselves particularly sticky. I'm sure I'm missing a bunch, but off the top of my head, here are a few. There's #dontgo, the hashtag that grew out of the House Republicans protest of the energy bill, which in turn spawned a mini movement and a good deal of news coverage. Then #suspend bubbled up when John McCain put a short-lived halt to his campaign to deal with the economic situation. And the anti-earmark #pork has been picked up by Republican Jeff Flake and fed into a "Pork Parade" site. I'm sure there are many more good ones I'm missing.

There's more bubbling up for tonight's Biden/Palin debate, aimed at tagging Twitter chatter. There are a pair on my radar screen. The first is #notmygal, an anti-Sarah Palin effort that's also tied to a vlogging project based on YouTube. The goal there is to tweet the hashtag whenever Palin says something disagreeable. And the second is #dirtycoal. The Sierra Club is, I hear, planning to use that one tonight as part of a campaign to counter the coal industry's "clean coal" ads that will likely air during the debate tonight.

With either Twemes or Twitter's in-house search, it's trivial to instantly see which hashtags are getting good pick up and which are fizzling. It may well now be the quickest way to kick ideas out into the world and see which ones are fit enough to thrive.

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Sad Reality

How social media changed the course of the Ferguson story; Ready for Hillary's 3-million-member email list; why Mark Cuban opposes net neutrality rules; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: All Against All

Why Uber isn't "the future" of cities; why journalists lost control of journalism; how Sean Parker is spending his political money; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Power Frames

The differences between "old power" and "new power"; Uber as a new/old power hybrid; debating Clay Shirky's feminist cred; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Creeping

Senator Al Franken's tough questions for Uber's CEO; how the NSA could make its phone metadata program permanent; global privacy groups launch a personal spyware catcher called Detekt; and much, much more. GO

Recreation.gov and other Govt Projects Move Toward Embracing New Digital Approach

A draft request for proposals for the revamping of Recreation.gov will include a requirement that reservation availability data be publicly accessible and that all proposals detail how they will enable third-party sales, as two members of the United States Digital Services have joined the government team overseeing the RFP, meeting some key demands of civic technologists and consumer oriented technology companies. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Ubermenschens

Surge-pricing in effect for Uber privacy violations; why "privacy" policies should be called "data usage" policies; pols silent on Uber mess; and much, much more. GO

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