Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

The Europe roundup: Pdfleaks - a symposium on Internet freedom

BY Antonella Napolitano | Monday, December 13 2010

  • Pdfleaks: a symposium on Internet freedom
    Have you followed our symposium on Wikileaks and Internet freedom that took place last Saturday in New York? Sessions archives are now available!
    Useful related material includes a list of essential readings on current Wikileaks controversy and a post by our associate editor Nick Judd who reports on professor Zeynep Tufekci's speech:

    States and corporations, she argued, simply move away from a jurisdiction where they could be held to account when they want to act in a way that's not consistent with the rule of law — or the oversight of their publics — in their home nation. Likening it to colonialism, she continued:
    "States have moved extra territorial ... in which an actor was not necessarily responsible, could not be held responsible, in the jurisdiction it was represented in," she said, later continuing, "actors are acting on a global scale to constrict us in a national one."

    (the hashtag was #pdfleaks)

  • UK | Wikileaks in the UK blogosphere
    PdF Europe curator Jon Worth notices that just a few left leaning UK bloggers have dealt with the Wikileaks issue. Why is that?
  • Open Data Day& the International Hackathon
    How did the Open data day/Hackaton go? Here's a post by David Eaves explaining the results, what you can do right now and what's next:

    I hope we can develop tools and resources to enable participants to engage with politicians and public servants on the importance of open data. The projects we hack on are powerful examples of what can be, but we also need to become more effective at explaining why open data matters in a language everyone understands. I’m hoping we’ll have resources to help us with this important task.

  • EU | Bloggers united and a good advice
    MEP Kristalina Georgieva had a chat with a few Bulgarian bloggers to ask them for advices:

    I learned that the common denominator for them was the disappointment with traditional media, which apparently does not offer enough reliable and relevant information. To my mind, not finding what you want to read about is a very good reason to write it yourself. This made me think – what is my reason to write?

    "Don’t blog just for the sake of having a new post here, do it when you want to share something" was the main suggestion. And Georgieva shares an example from her job on International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response, and then a list of the expected challenges for 2011 in her area.

Plus:
EU Career opportunities - via Writing for (y)EU
Developers needed at MySociety
EU officials, English proverbs and Latin words

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

With Vision of Internet Magna Carta, Web We Want Campaign Aims To Go Beyond Protest Mode

On Saturday, Tim Berners-Lee reiterated his call for an Internet Magna Carta to ensure the independence and openness of the World Wide Web and protection of user privacy. His remarks were part of the opening of the Web We Want Festival at the Southbank Centre in London, which the Web We Want campaign envisioned as only the start of a year long international process underlying his call to formulate concrete visions for the open web of the future, going beyond protests and the usual advocacy groups. GO

First POST: Lifestyles

Google's CEO on "work-life balance"; how CloudFlare just doubled the size of the encrypted web; Dems like Twitter; Reps like Pinterest; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Showdown

How demonstrators in Hong Kong are using mobile tech to route around government control; will the news penetrate mainland China?; dueling spin from Dems and Reps on which party's tech efforts will matter more in November; and much, much more. GO

friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

First POST: Dogfood

What ethical social networking might look like; can the iPhone promise more privacy?; how Obama did on transparency; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Sucks

How the FCC can't communicate; tech is getting more political; Facebook might see a lawsuit for its mood manipulation experiment; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Wartime

A bizarre online marketing effort targets actress Emma Watson; why the news media needs to defend the privacy of its online readers; Chicago's playbook for civic user testing; and much, much more. GO

More