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PdF Europe: Google Fellows Announced for Barcelona Conference

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, November 3 2009

We're pleased to announce the following twenty people have been selected to win a Google Fellowship to attend this month's Personal Democracy Forum Europe inaugural conference in Barcelona. The fellows were selected based on their work and initiative in the arenas of technology, politics and social entrepreneurship.

-Liz Azyan, doctoral researcher, Royal Holloway, University of London and founder, Local Government Engagement Online Research, an e-government blog
-Jeff Blasius, CTO and co-founder of SeeClickFix, a We.gov site
-Yves Canavet, former project director of France's national insurance program Caiesse Nationale d'Assurance Maladie
-Roberto Abdul-Hadi Casanova, co-founder, Asociacion Civil Sumate of Venezuela, a democracy-building site
-Michael Friis, programmer, TEDbot, a reverse hack of the EU database of public procurement contracts, and Folkets Ting of Denmark, a transparency site
-Jochum de Graaf, programmer, StemWijzer, the Netherlands most popular online political preference application and VoteMatch.eu
-Vassilis Goulandris, designer, e-dialogos, City of Trikala, Greece, an e-democracy project
-Stef van Grieken, Founder of the Netherlands' Hetnieuwestemmen transparency site.
-Julien Landfried, CEO of Actu Point Info and manager of ILovePolitics.info, a top political blog
-Mayo Fuster Morell, co-founder of Free Culture Forum and Networked Politics collaborative research, and doctoral researcher at the European University Institute
-Marko Rakar, founder, Pollitika.com of Croatia, one of the country's top political blogs and transparency sites
-Neils Erik Rasmussen, programmer, HvemStemmerHvad of Denmark, a transparency site
-Jessica Richman, Clarendon Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute
-Gavin Sheridan, co-founder of Ireland's transparency and anti-corruption sites KildareStreet.com, TheStory.ie, Mahontribunal.com and Publicinquiry.eu
-Gianluca Spinaci, Committee of the Regions of the European Union, in charge of reforming its presence on the net
-Flaminia Spadone, political consultant, Italian Ministry of Sports and Youth
-Susan Dzieduszycka Suinat, founder, Overseas Vote Foundation
-Ville Tapio, Fountain Park Ltd, which runs e-government public consultation projects like TellBarroso.eu and Eurokorva.fi
-Massimiliano Trovato, policy scholar at Milan's Istituto Bruno Leoni, a free-market think tank in Italy
-Gail Watt, Swedish e-democracy pioneer and part-time municipal politician

As Google Fellows to PdF Europe, each winner is receiving free admission to the conference, plus two days lodging at the conference hotel. In addition, Google will be hosting a special lunch for Fellows on the opening day of the conference, where they will have a chance to meet each other and several top Google staff who will be attending the conference.

Our congratulations to all; we look forward to meeting you in Barcelona!

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