Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Brazilians Protest Forced Evictions on YouTube and in Mock World Cup

BY Jessica McKenzie | Friday, June 14 2013

Screenshot from a YouTube video about forced evictions

Tomorrow Brazilians who have been forced out of their housing in advance of the 2014 World Cup will stage their own “People's Cup” in Rio de Janeiro to draw awareness to forced evictions.

“While the world counts down to the 2014 World Cup, another story is being told in the People's Cup. Communities who were likely quite excited at first about their country hosting the ultimate football tournament, today are facing costs many of us cannot imagine,” said the executive director of WITNESS, a human rights organization.

The evictions have not been pretty. The Guardian covered the eviction of an indigenous community in March, which was accomplished – at 2:30am – with the use of batons, tear gas and pepper spray.

Those affected have also been posting videos on YouTube in which they describe their experiences:

In Rio, the government has already moved 19,220 families since 2009, but a watchdog group says the number of evicted residents is closer to 40,000, reports the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Residents of Vila Autodromo, located nearby the future Olympic village, are trying to prevent the construction of a highway from cutting across their village. They have submitted an alternative proposal so that they won't have to leave their homes. As a bonus, their plan is less costly, too.  

Personal Democracy Media is grateful to the Omidyar Network and the UN Foundation for their generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.

News Briefs

RSS Feed wednesday >

New Media Sites in Iran Blur Lines Between Citizen Journo, Professional Journo, & Activist

In 2010, Newsweek declared Iran the “birthplace of citizen journalism.” Iranian bloggers were hailed by Westerners as “brave” for their coverage of the aftermath of the disputed 2009 election. A 40-second video of the death of Neda Agha-Soltan during an anti-government protest won a prestigious George Polk Award, the first anonymously-produced work to be so honored. And then came the 2013 study “Whither Blogestan,” which sought to explain Iran's shrinking blogosphere. Of nearly 25,000 highly active and connected blogs in 2008 and 2009, only 20 percent were still online in September 2013.

GO

More