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Weekly Global Readings: Transparency

BY Lisa Goldman and Antonella Napolitano | Wednesday, January 30 2013

Does Open Data make development more accountable? Transparency International tries to answer the question, using Colombia as a case study.

The Nieman Journalism Lab reports on a new phone app that helps verify events reported on social media.

Bulgaria held its Big Brother Awards this week. The anti-awards went to the 10 companies, institutions and individuals who have done the most to invade personal privacy.

On Chinese social media, the expression "got invited to tea" is a euphemism used by dissidents indicating they have been called in for questioning by the police.

When security forces failed to arrive after thugs broke into and shot up a Cairo luxury hotel near Tahrir Square this week, hotel staff sent out an SOS via Twitter.

Personal Democracy Media is grateful to the Omidyar Network for its generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Sad Reality

How social media changed the course of the Ferguson story; Ready for Hillary's 3-million-member email list; why Mark Cuban opposes net neutrality rules; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: All Against All

Why Uber isn't "the future" of cities; why journalists lost control of journalism; how Sean Parker is spending his political money; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Power Frames

The differences between "old power" and "new power"; Uber as a new/old power hybrid; debating Clay Shirky's feminist cred; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Creeping

Senator Al Franken's tough questions for Uber's CEO; how the NSA could make its phone metadata program permanent; global privacy groups launch a personal spyware catcher called Detekt; and much, much more. GO

Recreation.gov and other Govt Projects Move Toward Embracing New Digital Approach

A draft request for proposals for the revamping of Recreation.gov will include a requirement that reservation availability data be publicly accessible and that all proposals detail how they will enable third-party sales, as two members of the United States Digital Services have joined the government team overseeing the RFP, meeting some key demands of civic technologists and consumer oriented technology companies. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Ubermenschens

Surge-pricing in effect for Uber privacy violations; why "privacy" policies should be called "data usage" policies; pols silent on Uber mess; and much, much more. GO

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