Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

Volunteers Crowd Source a Map to Improve Urban Life in Nigeria's Capital City

BY Julia Wetherell | Tuesday, January 29 2013

A weeklong mapping initiative that kicked off last Saturday in the Nigerian capital of Abuja aims to crowdsource accurate, up-to-date information about the city’s amenities and public facilities. With a group of over 100 volunteers dispatched throughout the city, the “map-up” aims to improve the Google map of Abuja – a goal that could provide transparency for foreign investors and tourists, as well as for citizens seeking out resources at home.

Working with Map Maker — the same Google platform volunteers used to create the recently unveiled map of North Korea – collaborators in Abuja are marking hospitals, restaurants, hotels, and places of commerce. Many of them are covering the neighborhoods they already know intimately, putting inside knowledge to work to highlight local landmarks. It’s not just about finding a good lunch spot: filling in the gaps on Abuja’s streets could actually be a boon to emergency response in a city where incomplete roadmaps often stymie ambulances.

Organizers told the Voice of America that the ultimate goal is to bring mapping improvements to cities across Nigeria. A planned city that was officially named the capital in the early 1990s, Abuja is a more manageable testing ground than Lagos, Nigeria’s twice-as-populous former capital. If this initiative proves a success, it could bring transparent navigation to millions of Nigerians and visitors to the country.

Personal Democracy Media is grateful to the Omidyar Network for its generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Lifestyles

Google's CEO on "work-life balance"; how CloudFlare just doubled the size of the encrypted web; Dems like Twitter; Reps like Pinterest; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Showdown

How demonstrators in Hong Kong are using mobile tech to route around government control; will the news penetrate mainland China?; dueling spin from Dems and Reps on which party's tech efforts will matter more in November; and much, much more. GO

friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

First POST: Dogfood

What ethical social networking might look like; can the iPhone promise more privacy?; how Obama did on transparency; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Sucks

How the FCC can't communicate; tech is getting more political; Facebook might see a lawsuit for its mood manipulation experiment; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Wartime

A bizarre online marketing effort targets actress Emma Watson; why the news media needs to defend the privacy of its online readers; Chicago's playbook for civic user testing; and much, much more. GO

More