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Weekly Global Readings: Creativity

BY Lisa Goldman and Antonella Napolitano | Wednesday, January 23 2013

This week's theme is "creativity," whether it be photos of graffiti by Syrian anti-regime activists or a social media platform that fosters creativity and collaboration between young Indians.

Kenya is poised to launch a platform to host open access academic content. Hadithi will launch on January 24. (via Global Voices).

Shekhar Kapur, the director of Elizabeth: The Golden Age, teamed up with Indian musician A.R. Rahman (composer of the score for Slum Dog Millionaire) to create a social network platform that fosters creativity and collaboration. Qyuki ("because" in Hindi) targets Indians aged 18-35.

Syria's bloody civil war rages on, but some of the youthful opponents to the regime continue to use creative non-violent tactics. Global Voices posted a photo series of political graffiti spotted around Syria.

During the last elections in Uganda, the government tried to suppress political activity by blocking mobile text messages. In response, a new platform called Abiyama transforms SIM cards into storage devices that can be passed around. The platform won the Knight News Challenge: Mobile. TechPresident has more on this story.

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