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Weekly Global Readings: Creativity

BY Lisa Goldman and Antonella Napolitano | Wednesday, January 23 2013

This week's theme is "creativity," whether it be photos of graffiti by Syrian anti-regime activists or a social media platform that fosters creativity and collaboration between young Indians.

Kenya is poised to launch a platform to host open access academic content. Hadithi will launch on January 24. (via Global Voices).

Shekhar Kapur, the director of Elizabeth: The Golden Age, teamed up with Indian musician A.R. Rahman (composer of the score for Slum Dog Millionaire) to create a social network platform that fosters creativity and collaboration. Qyuki ("because" in Hindi) targets Indians aged 18-35.

Syria's bloody civil war rages on, but some of the youthful opponents to the regime continue to use creative non-violent tactics. Global Voices posted a photo series of political graffiti spotted around Syria.

During the last elections in Uganda, the government tried to suppress political activity by blocking mobile text messages. In response, a new platform called Abiyama transforms SIM cards into storage devices that can be passed around. The platform won the Knight News Challenge: Mobile. TechPresident has more on this story.

News Briefs

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It seems these days that car-hailing apps exist only to give cities grief. In New York, car sharing start-ups like Lyft ignore labor, safety insurance laws and in China, the situation is no different except in one regard: taxi hailing apps in China are proliferating at a faster rate than in the U.S. In China, however, the taxi system is very much in its infancy and local Chinese governments are struggling to control the proliferation of new apps that flout the law. GO

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The Uncertain Future of India's Plan to Biometrically Identify Everyone

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