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Weekly Global Readings: Wellbeing

BY Lisa Goldman and Antonella Napolitano | Wednesday, January 16 2013

The theme for this week's global readings is wellbeing. In China, cartoonists use social media as a platform for cartoons lampooning state censorship, evoking the old line about laughter being the best medicine. In Kenya, smartphone users can access healthcare services via a phone app. And in the Netherlands, a human rights organization is launching a campaign to show bloggers how to protect themselves.

Hivos, the Netherlands-based Humanist Institute for Cooperation, is launching a campaign called #DELETECONTROL. The purpose of the campaign is to help bloggers stay safe online by promoting tools against censorship, online surveillance and repression.

In China, cartoonists use social media as a platform to lampoon state-imposed censorship .

Estonia is launching a website that allows citizens to submit proposals for new regulations governing political activity. Rahvakogu.ee (The Citizens' Parliament) will be online from January to March 2013.

In Kenya, a new smartphone app called MedAfrica allows people to search for health care services and providers. MedAfrica lists professionals in a given area and provides a symptom checker for would-be patients.

Personal Democracy Media is grateful to the Omidyar Network for its generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.

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