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Putting Rights Violations on the Map in Iran

BY Julia Wetherell | Wednesday, January 2 2013

Screengrab of the Mapping Iran's Human Rights, from iranhumanrights.org

A new interactive map from the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran will track rights violations in the country by region. The Mapping Iran's Human Rights project geographically situates violations in four categories — perpetrators, victims, prison corruption, and regional trends — while generating new knowledge about corruption from sources in Iran.

Tehran
The capital region of Tehran.

In an interview with techPresident, Omid Memarian, an Iranian journalist and blogger who helped formulate the idea of the mapping project, said that the goal is to convey the diversity and density of rights violations throughout Iran. The map launched on December 19 with 50 citations across the country’s 31 provinces.

In-country sources — including some close to the families of political dissidents and the imprisoned – provide much of the data. Memarian said that they aim to add up to twenty new entries each month and to accumulate several hundred by the end of the year. Even with the small amount of data currently available, regional trends are already emergent, such as military killings of border-crossing couriers in the country’s western provinces of Kurdistan and West Azerbaijan.

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