Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

No Capslock Allowed: Ecuador Has Online Conduct Code for Election Banter

BY Julia Wetherell | Tuesday, December 18 2012

Screengrab of the National Electoral Council's election portal, Voto transparente, Conoce a Tu Candidato

Ecuador is gearing up for national elections in February with an online portal aimed at giving voters transparency in their process of choosing a candidate. Voto transparente, Conoce a Tu Candidato (“Transparent Voting: Know Your Candidate”) provides voter registration information, along with profiles of all candidates for office, including those running on the presidential ticket, as well as delegates to parliament, the national assembly, and regional assemblies. In addition, it also codifies 14 guidelines for conduct on social media during election season.

The Manual de Covivencia, or Manual of Coexistence, as the code of conduct is called, was presented on Sunday by CNE, the National Electoral Council, in response to the presidential debate held last week. Among its recommendations for Ecuadorian netizens are:

Help maintain a healthy and informative environment for public debate.

Share your knowledge with the community.

Be tolerant of people whose opinions you do not share.

If you write everything in capital letters, people will think you are shouting.

The Internet has played a significant role in this election cycle, with many candidates taking to social networks to promote their campaigns; the CNE, which places limits on televised political ads, has no such restrictions on the web. It has been suggested that CNE policies on traditional avenues of election advertising favor incumbent president Rafael Correa, who currently holds a strong lead in the polls. Online promotion could level the playing field for seven challenging presidential tickets.

Personal Democracy Media is grateful to the Omidyar Network for its generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.

News Briefs

RSS Feed today >

First POST: Outgassing

How Beijing is throttling expressions of solidarity with the Hong Kong democracy protests; is the DCCC going overboard with its online fundraising tactics?; SumOfUs's innovative new engagement metric; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

With Vision of Internet Magna Carta, Web We Want Campaign Aims To Go Beyond Protest Mode

On Saturday, Tim Berners-Lee reiterated his call for an Internet Magna Carta to ensure the independence and openness of the World Wide Web and protection of user privacy. His remarks were part of the opening of the Web We Want Festival at the Southbank Centre in London, which the Web We Want campaign envisioned as only the start of a year long international process underlying his call to formulate concrete visions for the open web of the future, going beyond protests and the usual advocacy groups. GO

First POST: Lifestyles

Google's CEO on "work-life balance"; how CloudFlare just doubled the size of the encrypted web; Dems like Twitter; Reps like Pinterest; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Showdown

How demonstrators in Hong Kong are using mobile tech to route around government control; will the news penetrate mainland China?; dueling spin from Dems and Reps on which party's tech efforts will matter more in November; and much, much more. GO

friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

First POST: Dogfood

What ethical social networking might look like; can the iPhone promise more privacy?; how Obama did on transparency; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Sucks

How the FCC can't communicate; tech is getting more political; Facebook might see a lawsuit for its mood manipulation experiment; and much, much more. GO

More