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Proposal to Allow Police Internet Monitoring Shot Down in UK Parliament

BY Julia Wetherell | Tuesday, December 11 2012

Deputy PM Nick Clegg (credit: Liberal Democrats/Flickr)

The deputy prime minister of the United Kingdom is leading efforts to block a bill that would give law enforcement unmitigated monitoring of Internet use in the UK. Nick Clegg criticized the scope of the proposed Communications Data Bill, which would require ISPs to store users’ email and web browser data for up to a year and permit law enforcement agencies to access this information without permission.

“…There is a problem that must be addressed to give law enforcement agencies the powers they need to fight crime. I agree. But that must be done in a proportionate way that gets the balance between security and liberty right."

Home Secretary Theresa May has rebuffed critics of the bill, claiming anyone opposed is favoring political allegiances over the lives of victims of terrorism, pedophilia, and other major crimes enabled by Internet usage. The bill is now being redrafted for review in 2013.

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