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Media Analysts Wonder if Israel and Hamas are Allowed to Issue Death Threats on Twitter

BY Lisa Goldman | Wednesday, November 21 2012

With a shaky ceasefire just taking effect in Gaza, media analysts are still talking about the online war — the one that was fought between official and unofficial supporters of Israel and Gazan Palestinians.

As noted on techPresident, Israel made history by being the first country to announce on Twitter that it was going to war. The initial curt statement — which was issued in English — was soon followed by not-so-veiled threats. The IDF Spokesperson advised reporters in Gaza to keep away from Hamas officials, the implication being that they were targets; and Hamas's military branch, the Al Qassam Brigade, promising (presumably violent) revenge.

Now Anthony De Rosa (@@antderosa), social media editor for Reuters, wonders if issuing threats of violence via Twitter violate Twitter's policies — and if so, whether or not Twitter would respond:

“I’d love to see if Twitter would give answer as to how these war tweets that seem to make direct threats don’t violate terms of service.”

De Rosa explores this question with Dave Rubin (@rubinreport) in an interesting podcast, embedded below.

Personal Democracy Media is grateful to The Omidyar Network for its generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.

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