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First POST: Endorsed

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, September 2 2014

Endorsed

  • We here at Personal Democracy Media are endorsing Zephyr Teachout and Tim Wu, who are running in next Tuesday's Democratic gubernatorial primary here in New York.

  • Armed with $1.5 billion in venture capital, Uber is waging a stealth campaign to undermine Lyft and other transportation networking companies, reports Casey Newton for the Verge. Its tactics include Uber employees ordering and then canceling thousands of Lyft rides and giving them burner phones to avoid detection.

  • Salon's Andrew Leonard picks up on Newton's story to argue that Uber's actions are the equivalent of the 19th century's robber barons and asks, "What happens when a company with the DNA of Uber ends up winning it all?…What happens when Uber’s priorities turn to generating cash rather than spending it? What happens to labor — the Uber drivers — when they have no alternative but Uber? What happens when it rains and the surge-pricing spikes and there’s nowhere else to go?"

  • Related: A German court has ordered Uber to suspend its services in the country, David Meyer reports for GigaOm. The company is fighting the ruling.

  • In Wired, Steven Levy (didn't he go to Medium?) reports on White House CTO Todd Park's new gig, as President Obama's go-to recruiter in Silicon Valley. According to Levy, Park's role in overseeing the Silicon Valley team that saved HealthCare.gov last fall has "provided a potential blueprint for reform." He writes:

    What if Park could duplicate this tech surge, creating similar squads of Silicon Valley types, parachuting them into bureaucracies to fix pressing tech problems? Could they actually clear the way for a golden era of gov-tech, where transformative apps were as likely to come from DC as they were from San Francisco or Mountain View, and people loved to use federal services as much as Googling and buying products on Amazon?

  • One more thread in the tangled web that is Anonymous, the loose-knit hacker collective, gets spooled out in a long feature in The New Yorker by David Kushner. His subject, a middle-aged hacktivist named Christopher Doyon, who went for many years by the pseudonym Commander X, was DDOSing the recording industry back in 2001--well before Anonymous' emergence. In Kushner's telling, he's been deeply involved in everything from Operation Payback (defending WikiLeaks), to Operation Tunisia to the recent cacophony of activity around events in Ferguson, Missouri.

  • Patrick Meier points to a high-def video of Gaza City's wrecked suburb of Al-Shejaiya, produced by a media company using a UAV.

  • Grover Norquist went to Burning Man, where he learned many things, reports Kevin Roose for New York magazine.

News Briefs

RSS Feed wednesday >

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tuesday >

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On Saturday, Tim Berners-Lee reiterated his call for an Internet Magna Carta to ensure the independence and openness of the World Wide Web and protection of user privacy. His remarks were part of the opening of the Web We Want Festival at the Southbank Centre in London, which the Web We Want campaign envisioned as only the start of a year long international process underlying his call to formulate concrete visions for the open web of the future, going beyond protests and the usual advocacy groups. GO

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monday >

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friday >

Pirate MEP Crowdsources Internet Policy Questions For Designated EU Commissioners

While the Pirate Party within Germany was facing internal disputes over the last week, the German Pirate Party member in the European Parliament, Julia Reda, is seeking to make the European Commission appointment process more transparent by crowdsourcing questions for the designated Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society and the designated Vice President for the Digital Single Market. GO

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thursday >

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