Personal Democracy Plus Our premium content network. LEARN MORE You are not logged in. LOG IN NOW >

First POST: Georemixing

BY Micah L. Sifry | Thursday, May 22 2014

Georemixing

  • Riffing off of the success of Pharell Williams' "Happy" and YouTube homage culture, and the plight of the young Iranians who tried to join in, MIT's Ethan Zuckerman shares his thoughts in a must-read Atlantic piece on the evolution of the "georemix" and what it means when people around the world jump on a meme.

  • The six Iranians arrested for posted their "Happy" video to YouTube have been released on bail, and their case illustrates the ongoing clash between religious conservatives and a more moderate faction represented by the country's president Hassan Rouhani, Rick Gladstone reports for the New York Times.

  • Six months before going public, NSA contractor Edward Snowden helped organize a "cryptoparty" -- where people learn how to use encryption and improve their personal online security -- in Hawaii, where he was living, reports Kevin Poulsen for Wired.

  • The Electronic Frontier Foundation is expressing its dismay at the amended version of the USA Freedom Act that came out of the House Rules committee yesterday.

  • Meanwhile, the White House says it "strongly supports" the bill, which is due for a vote today in the House.

  • Micah Lee, The Intercept's staff technologist, has released Onionshare, free software to enable anyone to send large files securely and anonymously, Andy Greenberg reports for Wired.

  • Facebook is pushing notices to all 1.28 billion of its users urging them to update their privacy settings. But you probably already know that. And it says it will also change how it treats new users, setting their posts initially to only be seen by friends, rather than the whole world.

  • After a lengthy legal fight, Airbnb is giving New York's Attorney General Eric Schneiderman detailed information on hosts in New York City, minus personally identifiable information. Both sides declared victory at the deal, reports David Streitfeld for the Times.

  • Speaking of Attorneys General, California's Kamala Harris is pressing websites to comply with a new state privacy law and tell visitors clearly if they are respecting users' "do not track" preferences. Currently, Twitter is the only major web site that honors such signals, Vindu Goel reports for the Times' Bits blog.

  • The community discussion site Metafilter is being forced to cut staff, due to steep reductions in traffic sent to it by Google, its founder Matt Haughey explains on Medium. Is this one more sign of the die-off of first-generation web communities? Perhaps not, as hundreds of Metafilter fans are responding with donations.

  • Speaking of crowdfunding, the SEC has yet to issue final rules for allowing start-ups to sell stock to ordinary investors, and Robb Mandelbaum says that industry boosters have failed to take the risks into account.

  • France now has its own State Chief Data Officer, and apparently its ETALAB has a devotion to very small font sizes.

  • Indian teenager briefly snags vacant Twitter account of India's Prime Minister, @PMOIndia.

  • A status report from the drafters and supporters of the Magna Carta for Philippines Internet Freedom, on the progress of their draft legislation through the legislature there.

  • The former director of the State Department's eDiplomacy office, Richard Boly, is celebrating his retirement by biking across the US, solo.. Here's his Tumblr. We are officially jealous.

News Briefs

RSS Feed monday >

After Election Loss, Teachout and Wu Keep Up Net Neutrality an Anti-Comcast Merger Campaign

The Teachout/Wu campaign may have lost, but their pro net-neutrality campaign continued Monday as both former candidates participated in a rallly in New York City marking the final day to comment on the Federal Communications Commission's Internet proposals and kept up their pressure on Governor Andrew Cuomo. GO

friday >

NYC Politicians and Advocacy Groups Say Airbnb Misrepresents Sharing Economy

A coalition of New York election officials and affordable housing groups have launched an advocacy effort targeting Airbnb called "Share Better" that includes an ad campaign, a web platform, and social media outreach. GO

First POST: Data Dumps

The Internet Slowdown's impact on the FCC; Uber drivers try to go on strike; four kinds of civic tech; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Positive Sums

How Teachout won some wealthy districts while Cuomo won some poor ones; DailyKos's explosive traffic growth; using Facebook for voter targeting; and much, much more. GO

wednesday >

First POST: Emergence

Evaluating the Teachout-Wu challenge; net neutrality defenders invoke an "internet slowdown"; NYC's first CTO; and much, much more. GO

tuesday >

De Blasio Names Minerva Tantoco First New York City CTO

Mayor Bill de Blasio named Minerva Tantoco as first New York City CTO Tuesday night in an announcement that was greeted with applause and cheers at the September meeting of the New York Tech Meet-Up. In his remarks, De Blasio said her task would be to develop a coordinated strategy for technology and innovation as it affects the city as a whole and the role of technology in all aspects of civic life from the economy and schools to civic participation, leading to a "redemocratization of society." He called Tantoco the perfect fit for the position as a somebody who is "great with technology, has a lot of experience, abiltiy and energy and ability to create from scratch and is a true New Yorker." GO

First POST: Fusion Politics

The Teachout-Wu Cuomo-Hochul race as it comes to a close; more criticism for Reddit as it prepares a major new round of funding; First Lady Michelle Obama as an Upworthy curator; and much, much more. GO

More