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First POST: Having It All

BY Micah L. Sifry | Tuesday, May 13 2014

Having It All

  • "The NSA routinely receives – or intercepts – routers, servers and other computer network devices being exported from the US before they are delivered to the international customers," reports Glenn Greenwald, in an exclusive excerpt from his new book on Edward Snowden, No Place to Hide, which hits bookstores today.

  • One NSA slide reprinted in Greenwald's book read, "Sniff it all, Know it all, Collect it all, Process it all, Exploit it all, Partner it all."

  • That's from Ed Pilkington's lengthy and colorful profile of Greenwald in The Guardian. Also, this revealing comment about why First Look Media is still in its early stages: "Putting together a new media organisation is more difficult than I'd anticipated. Which makes sense, as I've never done it before. To me it was just: give me a fucking website and stand out the way."

  • Greenwald's book also reveals more details of US spying on diplomatic embassies and missions, Charlie Savage reports for the New York Times.

  • Georgetown law professor David Cole's review of No Place to Hide in the Washington Post emphasizes the sheer audacity of the NSA's data collection programs. He writes:

    In a one-month period last year, for example, a single unit of the NSA, the Global Access Operations unit, collected data on more than 97 billion e-mails and 124 billion phone calls from around the world; more than 3 billion of those calls and e-mails were collected as they passed through the United States. As of 2012, the agency was processing more than 20 billion telecommunications per day. In a single month in 2011, the NSA collected 71 million calls and e-mails from Poland alone — not a major hub of terrorist activity, the last I checked. The NSA has admitted that “it collects far more content than is routinely useful to analysts.” These numbers call to mind Sen. Everett Dirksen’s quip about government spending: “A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money.”

  • Cole, who is also a columnist for the Nation magazine, lambastes Greenwald for seeing the world too much "in black and white….[with] apparently nothing in between. Anyone who does not share his radical dissent is, therefore, a tool for the political elite."

  • A team of developers (Aaron Snow, Mollie Ruskin, Sean Herron and Noah Kunin) at 18F, the GSA's new development shop, explains how the NotAlone.gov site was developed in tandem with the recent White House task force on protecting students from sexual assault.

  • Today from 2-3pm EDT, Gigi Sohn, the FCC senior counsel for external affairs, will be holding a Twitter chat. Use #FCCNetNeutrality to join in.

  • Europe's top court has ruled that people may sue companies like Google to have sensitive information removed from search results on their name, Reuters reports.

News Briefs

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friday >

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