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First POST: In Transit

BY Micah L. Sifry | Friday, April 11 2014

In Transit

  • Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras are making their first visit to the US since helping break the NSA surveillance story, to accept a Polk Award along with Ewen MacAskill and Barton Gellman here in NYC Friday midday. They are flying with an ACLU lawyer and will be met by other ACLU staff on arrival. Both face the risk of being subpoenaed by federal prosecutors. I'll be live-tweeting from the event, assuming there's connectivity.

  • WikiLeaks tweets that they are on Flight SIA26 bound for JFK, having been dropped off at the Berlin airport by Tor's Jacob Appelbaum, no stranger to border security harassment.

  • The appointment of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to Dropbox's board of directors has prompted an online protest campaign. The hashtag #dropdropbox is spreading rapidly on Twitter. Netizens are pointing to her support for warrantless wiretapping as a key reason for the protest.

  • Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sibelius "resigns after troubles over health site," headlines today's New York Times.

  • Or, if you prefer, she's resigning "because Obamacare has won," headlines Ezra Klein's Vox.

  • The DATA Act has passed the Senate, after clearing the House last November. Its goal is to improve federal spending transparency. The Sunlight Foundation's Matthew Rumsey reviews the background leading up to the law.

  • In Foreign Affairs, Stacie Pettyjohn explains why Washington's decision to cede control of ICANN actually reinforces the multistakeholder model of Internet governance and will help "ensure that the Internet will remain open and free."

  • Fifth graders in a Queens public school are learning about social media as part of coursework on digital literacy, reports Alex Vadukul for the New York Times.

  • Here's a nifty map of day care centers in New York City, made by volunteers from the BetaNYC community mashing up public data.

  • Trey Grayson, the head of the Harvard Kennedy School's Institute of Politics and a friend of PDM, is stepping down at the end of June. We wish him the best.

News Briefs

RSS Feed tuesday >

First POST: Company

The global "Snowden effect" is huge; how many consumer-facing online services fail the user privacy test; the Dems' 2016 digital to-do list; and much, much more. GO

monday >

First POST: Mood Slime

The Sony email leak reveals the MPAA's campaign against Google; how Uber is lobbying in local markets; mapping the #MillionsMarchNYC; and much, much more. GO

friday >

First POST: Cloudy

What the Internet is not; new analysis of public opinion on net neutrality; how cloud backup apparently foiled a police coverup; and much, much more. GO

thursday >

First POST: Records

Is the future of citizen journalism vigilantism?; one tech mogul's vocal support for CIA torture; a cri de couer from the founder of the Pirate Bay; and much, much more. GO

Web Index Sees Impact of Net Neutrality, Surveillance and Copyright Laws

Denmark, Finland, Norway, the United Kingdom and Sweden have come out on top of the Web Index, a ranking of the Web Foundation measuring the economic, social and political benefit that countries gain from the web. The United States is at number six. For the authors of the report accompanying the index, the results reflect how inequality has an impact on access to the web. "Nordic policy-makers have been quick to adopt and promote the free Internet - and open access to information - as a 21st century public good," the report states. " Others, as this year's findings show, need to move fast to catch up." The report attributes the Scandinavian countries' advantage to the countries' broader efforts to invest in public goods and establish a welfare and acting against " excess concentrations of wealth and power." With the lower inequality in those countries than in others, "the skills, means and freedoms to benefit from new technologies are widespread, which helps to explain why Scandinavian countries score highly on the political, social and economic impact of the Web GO

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